Use of cell-permeable peptides to prevent neuronal degeneration

Tiziana Borsello, Christophe Bonny

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The loss of neurons is a hallmark of neurodegenerative disorders and evidence suggests that this occurs through an apoptotic mechanism. Following an insult, neuronal cells activate signal transduction pathways that lead to cell death and the establishment of the pathological state. The mechanisms underlying the cell-death response involve protein kinases, which phosphorylate many substrates and culminate in changes in gene expression. Traditionally, attempts at blocking such signaling targeted the phosphorylation of the substrates. However, preventing the interaction between two proteins using specific peptides might block the function of key mediators in signaling cascades. A cell-permeable peptide designed specifically to inhibit c-Jun N-terminal kinase action proved successful in in vivo models of neuronal degeneration following ischemia. Here, the recent findings that highlight the potential of this approach for therapeutic application are reviewed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)239-244
Number of pages6
JournalTrends in Molecular Medicine
Volume10
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2004

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Cell Death
Peptides
JNK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Protein Kinases
Signal Transduction
Ischemia
Phosphorylation
Gene Expression
Neurons
Proteins
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Use of cell-permeable peptides to prevent neuronal degeneration. / Borsello, Tiziana; Bonny, Christophe.

In: Trends in Molecular Medicine, Vol. 10, No. 5, 01.05.2004, p. 239-244.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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