Use of immunoblotting and monoclonal antibodies to evaluate the residual antigenic activity of milk protein hydrolysed formulae

P. Restani, A. Plebani, T. Velonà, G. Cavagni, A. G. Ugazio, C. Poiesi, A. Muraro, C. L. Galli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Partial and extensive hydrolysed protein formulae have been developed to lower or eliminate the antigenicity of milk proteins. Although normally well tolerated, extensive hydrolysates have been reported to induce serious allergic reactions in very sensitive children. Moreover, clinical practice has often raised concern about the role of partial hydrolysates in cow's milk allergy prevention. Objective: Starting from these considerations, we used anti-casein monoclonal antibodies to evaluate the presence of residual antigenic activity in both partially and extensively protein hydrolysates. Methods: Electrophoretic analyses associated with immunoblotting technique were performed using nine protein-enriched commercial formulae. Results: The presence of different amounts of residual intact cow's milk proteins and/or polypeptidic material with conserved antigenic activity (according to the extensive or partial hydrolysis) was verified in most milk-based samples considered. Conclusion: The use of monoclonal antibodies and immunoblotting could be useful for the quality control of commercial 'hypoallergenic' formulae.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1182-1187
Number of pages6
JournalClinical and Experimental Allergy
Volume26
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1996

Fingerprint

Milk Proteins
Immunoblotting
Monoclonal Antibodies
Milk Hypersensitivity
Protein Hydrolysates
Caseins
Quality Control
Hypersensitivity
Milk
Proteins
Hydrolysis

Keywords

  • Cow's milk allergy
  • Hydrolysed protein formulae
  • Immunoblotting
  • Monoclonal antibodies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Use of immunoblotting and monoclonal antibodies to evaluate the residual antigenic activity of milk protein hydrolysed formulae. / Restani, P.; Plebani, A.; Velonà, T.; Cavagni, G.; Ugazio, A. G.; Poiesi, C.; Muraro, A.; Galli, C. L.

In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, Vol. 26, No. 10, 1996, p. 1182-1187.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Restani, P. ; Plebani, A. ; Velonà, T. ; Cavagni, G. ; Ugazio, A. G. ; Poiesi, C. ; Muraro, A. ; Galli, C. L. / Use of immunoblotting and monoclonal antibodies to evaluate the residual antigenic activity of milk protein hydrolysed formulae. In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy. 1996 ; Vol. 26, No. 10. pp. 1182-1187.
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AU - Velonà, T.

AU - Cavagni, G.

AU - Ugazio, A. G.

AU - Poiesi, C.

AU - Muraro, A.

AU - Galli, C. L.

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