Use of lipidomics to investigate sebum dysfunction in juvenile acne

Emanuela Camera, Matteo Ludovici, Sara Tortorella, Jo Linda Sinagra, Bruno Capitanio, Laura Goracci, Mauro Picardo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Acne is a multifactorial skin disorder frequently observed during adolescence with different grades of severity. Multiple factors centering on sebum secretion are implicated in acne pathogenesis. Despite the recognized role of sebum, its compositional complexity and limited analytical approaches have hampered investigation of alterations specifically associated with acne. To examine the profiles of lipid distribution in acne sebum, 61 adolescents (29 males and 32 females) were enrolled in this study. Seventeen subjects presented no apparent clinical signs of acne. The 44 affected individuals were clinically classified as mild (13 individuals), moderate (19 individuals), and severe (12 individuals) acne. Sebum was sampled from the forehead with SebutapeTM adhesive patches. Profiles of neutral lipids were acquired with rapid-resolution reversed-phase/HPLC-TOF/ MS in positive ion mode. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses led to the identification of lipid species with significantly different levels between healthy and acne sebum. The majority of differentiating lipid species were diacylglycerols (DGs), followed by fatty acyls, sterols, and prenols. Overall, the data indicated an association between the clinical grading of acne and sebaceous lipid fingerprints and highlighted DGs as more abundant in sebum from adolescents affected with acne.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1051-1058
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Lipid Research
Volume57
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2016

Fingerprint

Sebum
Acne Vulgaris
Lipids
Diglycerides
Sterols
Adhesives
Skin
Positive ions
Forehead
Dermatoglyphics
Multivariate Analysis
High Pressure Liquid Chromatography
Ions

Keywords

  • Chemometrics
  • Glycerides
  • Mass spectrometry
  • Skin lipidome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Use of lipidomics to investigate sebum dysfunction in juvenile acne. / Camera, Emanuela; Ludovici, Matteo; Tortorella, Sara; Sinagra, Jo Linda; Capitanio, Bruno; Goracci, Laura; Picardo, Mauro.

In: Journal of Lipid Research, Vol. 57, No. 6, 01.06.2016, p. 1051-1058.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Camera, Emanuela ; Ludovici, Matteo ; Tortorella, Sara ; Sinagra, Jo Linda ; Capitanio, Bruno ; Goracci, Laura ; Picardo, Mauro. / Use of lipidomics to investigate sebum dysfunction in juvenile acne. In: Journal of Lipid Research. 2016 ; Vol. 57, No. 6. pp. 1051-1058.
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