Use of Sodium Hypochlorite for Skin Antisepsis Before Inserting a Peripheral Venous Catheter: A Pilot Study

Cristiana Forni, Tania Sabattini, Fabio D’Alessandro, Ambra Fiorani, Simonetta Gamberini, Alessandra Maso, Rosa Curci, Enrichetta Zanotti, Paolo Chiari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Although it can be prevented, catheter-related bacteremia is common and dangerous. The antiseptics most widely used during insertion of peripheral venous catheters (PVCs) include povidone iodine, alcohol, and chlorhexidine. Another widely used antiseptic is a solution of 0.057 g sodium hypochlorite. This pilot study explored the contamination rate of the PVC tip inserted after skin decontamination with sodium hypochlorite. Culture analysis of the tips of the PVCs inserted into the 42 participants showed 7 (16.7%) colonized catheters. The results of this pilot study suggest taking into serious consideration the assessment of this antiseptic in randomized experimental studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)330-333
Number of pages4
JournalBiological Research for Nursing
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 4 2015

Keywords

  • antisepsis
  • peripheral venous catheter
  • sodium hypochlorite
  • tip contamination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Research and Theory
  • Medicine(all)

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