Use of the lymphocyte cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay in occupational biomonitoring of genome damage caused by in vivo exposure to chemical genotoxins: Past, present and future

Armen Nersesyan, Michael Fenech, Claudia Bolognesi, Miroslav Misik, Tahereh Setayesh, Georg Wultsch, Stefano Aurelio Bonassi, Philip Thomas, Siegfried Knasmueller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article concerns the use of the lymphocyte cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay in biomonitoring of occupational and environmental exposures to genotoxic agents. Furthermore, we evaluated the use of this method in different exposure scenarios, in comparison to other DNA damage biomarkers and its regional distribution. So far ca. 400 studies have been published and the number increased substantially in the last years. The most frequently investigated groups are hospital personnel, followed by workers in the chemical industry and agricultural workers. The lymphocyte CBMN assay is more frequently used in occupational studies than MN assays with epithelial cells and other methods, such as chromosomal aberration analyses, Comet assay and DNA-adduct measurements. The use of probes which enable the discrimination between MN containing chromosome fragments and whole chromosomes allows the identification of the molecular mechanisms of MN formation. Most studies were performed in Europe and Asia (ca. 65% and 25%, respectively). Important future developments will be the evaluation of the biological consequences of formation of additional nuclear endpoints (e.g. nucleoplasmic bridges), the improvement of the understanding of the health consequences of their formation, and the use of automated scoring devices. Future applications of the CBMN assay should address new emerging problems, e.g. the potential genotoxic damage induced by the use of nanoparticles and mobile phones. The control of occupational exposures to chemical genotoxins is currently based on chemical measurements which do not reflect interactions of individual factors and the inclusion of the lymphocyte CBMN assay in routine surveillance of workers could contribute substantially to the prevention of adverse health effects.

Original languageEnglish
JournalMutation Research - Reviews in Mutation Research
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Mar 21 2016

Fingerprint

Micronucleus Tests
Cytokinesis
Environmental Monitoring
Mutagens
Genome
Lymphocytes
Occupational Exposure
Chromosomes
Hospital Personnel
Chemical Industry
Cell Phones
Comet Assay
DNA Adducts
Environmental Exposure
Health
Chromosome Aberrations
Nanoparticles
DNA Damage
Biomarkers
Epithelial Cells

Keywords

  • Cytochalasin-B
  • Cytokinesis-block
  • Environmental exposure
  • Lymphocytes
  • Micronucleus
  • Occupational exposure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Use of the lymphocyte cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay in occupational biomonitoring of genome damage caused by in vivo exposure to chemical genotoxins : Past, present and future. / Nersesyan, Armen; Fenech, Michael; Bolognesi, Claudia; Misik, Miroslav; Setayesh, Tahereh; Wultsch, Georg; Bonassi, Stefano Aurelio; Thomas, Philip; Knasmueller, Siegfried.

In: Mutation Research - Reviews in Mutation Research, 21.03.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{ce11e50146e84955bd7050b22f744745,
title = "Use of the lymphocyte cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay in occupational biomonitoring of genome damage caused by in vivo exposure to chemical genotoxins: Past, present and future",
abstract = "This article concerns the use of the lymphocyte cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay in biomonitoring of occupational and environmental exposures to genotoxic agents. Furthermore, we evaluated the use of this method in different exposure scenarios, in comparison to other DNA damage biomarkers and its regional distribution. So far ca. 400 studies have been published and the number increased substantially in the last years. The most frequently investigated groups are hospital personnel, followed by workers in the chemical industry and agricultural workers. The lymphocyte CBMN assay is more frequently used in occupational studies than MN assays with epithelial cells and other methods, such as chromosomal aberration analyses, Comet assay and DNA-adduct measurements. The use of probes which enable the discrimination between MN containing chromosome fragments and whole chromosomes allows the identification of the molecular mechanisms of MN formation. Most studies were performed in Europe and Asia (ca. 65{\%} and 25{\%}, respectively). Important future developments will be the evaluation of the biological consequences of formation of additional nuclear endpoints (e.g. nucleoplasmic bridges), the improvement of the understanding of the health consequences of their formation, and the use of automated scoring devices. Future applications of the CBMN assay should address new emerging problems, e.g. the potential genotoxic damage induced by the use of nanoparticles and mobile phones. The control of occupational exposures to chemical genotoxins is currently based on chemical measurements which do not reflect interactions of individual factors and the inclusion of the lymphocyte CBMN assay in routine surveillance of workers could contribute substantially to the prevention of adverse health effects.",
keywords = "Cytochalasin-B, Cytokinesis-block, Environmental exposure, Lymphocytes, Micronucleus, Occupational exposure",
author = "Armen Nersesyan and Michael Fenech and Claudia Bolognesi and Miroslav Misik and Tahereh Setayesh and Georg Wultsch and Bonassi, {Stefano Aurelio} and Philip Thomas and Siegfried Knasmueller",
year = "2016",
month = "3",
day = "21",
doi = "10.1016/j.mrrev.2016.05.003",
language = "English",
journal = "Mutation Research - Reviews in Mutation Research",
issn = "1383-5742",
publisher = "Elsevier B.V.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Use of the lymphocyte cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay in occupational biomonitoring of genome damage caused by in vivo exposure to chemical genotoxins

T2 - Past, present and future

AU - Nersesyan, Armen

AU - Fenech, Michael

AU - Bolognesi, Claudia

AU - Misik, Miroslav

AU - Setayesh, Tahereh

AU - Wultsch, Georg

AU - Bonassi, Stefano Aurelio

AU - Thomas, Philip

AU - Knasmueller, Siegfried

PY - 2016/3/21

Y1 - 2016/3/21

N2 - This article concerns the use of the lymphocyte cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay in biomonitoring of occupational and environmental exposures to genotoxic agents. Furthermore, we evaluated the use of this method in different exposure scenarios, in comparison to other DNA damage biomarkers and its regional distribution. So far ca. 400 studies have been published and the number increased substantially in the last years. The most frequently investigated groups are hospital personnel, followed by workers in the chemical industry and agricultural workers. The lymphocyte CBMN assay is more frequently used in occupational studies than MN assays with epithelial cells and other methods, such as chromosomal aberration analyses, Comet assay and DNA-adduct measurements. The use of probes which enable the discrimination between MN containing chromosome fragments and whole chromosomes allows the identification of the molecular mechanisms of MN formation. Most studies were performed in Europe and Asia (ca. 65% and 25%, respectively). Important future developments will be the evaluation of the biological consequences of formation of additional nuclear endpoints (e.g. nucleoplasmic bridges), the improvement of the understanding of the health consequences of their formation, and the use of automated scoring devices. Future applications of the CBMN assay should address new emerging problems, e.g. the potential genotoxic damage induced by the use of nanoparticles and mobile phones. The control of occupational exposures to chemical genotoxins is currently based on chemical measurements which do not reflect interactions of individual factors and the inclusion of the lymphocyte CBMN assay in routine surveillance of workers could contribute substantially to the prevention of adverse health effects.

AB - This article concerns the use of the lymphocyte cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay in biomonitoring of occupational and environmental exposures to genotoxic agents. Furthermore, we evaluated the use of this method in different exposure scenarios, in comparison to other DNA damage biomarkers and its regional distribution. So far ca. 400 studies have been published and the number increased substantially in the last years. The most frequently investigated groups are hospital personnel, followed by workers in the chemical industry and agricultural workers. The lymphocyte CBMN assay is more frequently used in occupational studies than MN assays with epithelial cells and other methods, such as chromosomal aberration analyses, Comet assay and DNA-adduct measurements. The use of probes which enable the discrimination between MN containing chromosome fragments and whole chromosomes allows the identification of the molecular mechanisms of MN formation. Most studies were performed in Europe and Asia (ca. 65% and 25%, respectively). Important future developments will be the evaluation of the biological consequences of formation of additional nuclear endpoints (e.g. nucleoplasmic bridges), the improvement of the understanding of the health consequences of their formation, and the use of automated scoring devices. Future applications of the CBMN assay should address new emerging problems, e.g. the potential genotoxic damage induced by the use of nanoparticles and mobile phones. The control of occupational exposures to chemical genotoxins is currently based on chemical measurements which do not reflect interactions of individual factors and the inclusion of the lymphocyte CBMN assay in routine surveillance of workers could contribute substantially to the prevention of adverse health effects.

KW - Cytochalasin-B

KW - Cytokinesis-block

KW - Environmental exposure

KW - Lymphocytes

KW - Micronucleus

KW - Occupational exposure

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84973505614&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84973505614&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.mrrev.2016.05.003

DO - 10.1016/j.mrrev.2016.05.003

M3 - Article

JO - Mutation Research - Reviews in Mutation Research

JF - Mutation Research - Reviews in Mutation Research

SN - 1383-5742

ER -