Usefulness of stress testing for the evaluation of hypertensive heart disease in young hypertensive subjects

S. C. Wu, M. B. Secchi, S. Mancarella, L. Fossa, L. Bettazzi, L. Oltrona, A. Ciro, M. Civelli, G. Folli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

To investigate the usefulness of stress testing for the evaluation of hypertensive heart disease, 40 subjects, 28 men and 12 women (mean age 30.8 ± 6.2 years), with mild or moderate hypertension, without ST segment or T wave abnormalities in their resting ECG, were examined. 13 patients (32.5%) showed exercise-induced ST segment depression. The heart rate at rest was significantly higher in the patients with a positive response; 6 of the 7 subjects with electrocardiographic signs of left ventricular hypertrophy (summed SV1 + maximum R V5/V6 voltage of 45 mm or more) had a positive exercise electrocardiographic test. There were no significant differences between positive and negative cases in age, sex, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, or the double product (heart rate X systolic pressure) at rest or during exercise. After resting blood pressure values had been significantly decreased by giving methyldopa with or without diuretics for at least 6 months, there were a regression of left ventricular hypertrophy in the resting ECG and an impressive reduction in the prevalence of exercise-positive responses (to 17.5%). In the 7 patients with positive exercise electrocardiographic tests even after antihypertensive treatment, no significant reduction in blood pressure values during exercise was obtained.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)277-283
Number of pages7
JournalCardiology
Volume71
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 1984

Keywords

  • Exercise blood pressure
  • Hypertension
  • Hypertensive heart disease
  • ST segment depression
  • Stress testing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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