Using elderly donors in liver transplantation

G. L. Grazi, M. Ravaioli, M. Zanello, G. Ercolani, M. Cescon, G. Varotti, M. Del Gaudio, G. Vetrone, A. Lauro, G. Ramacciato, A. D. Pinna

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim. Elderly donors are half of the grafts available in our center for liver transplantation. We retrospectively investigated their characteristics, outcomes, and variables related to graft failure. Material and methods. From 1996 to 2003, 540 (46.4%) of 1163 donors were older than 60 years of age and 236 grafts (43.4%) were transplanted, whereas the others were refused. The clinical investigated variables were examined among this cohort. Results. The median age of donors increased from 37 to 62 years. Donors older than 60 years of age were more often refused than younger ones (66% vs 44%); HCV-positive (9.9% vs 5.4%); HbcAb-positive (18.6% vs 12.6%), and steatotic (35.7% vs 13.9%; P <.01). Among donors older than 60 years, the main parameter to refuse the graft was the grade of steatosis. The variables related to the graft loss from donors older than 60 years were as follows: model for end stage liver disease (MELD) recipient >15 (65% vs 39%), cold ischemia time >10 hours (25% vs 13%), high blood losses (3987 ± 4764 vs 2664 ± 2043 mL), and year of liver transplantation after 2000 (26% vs 46%; P <.01). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year graft survival rates were significantly lower among donors older than 60 years than other donors: 75%, 65%, and 62% versus 85%, 83%, and 78%, respectively (P <.001). Conclusion. Donors older than 60 years of age provided liver transplants to half of our recipients. The graft survival rate of these organs was lower than that of younger donors and to improve it the other risk variables for poor outcome should be reduced, including MELD score of the recipient and prolonged cold ischemia time.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2582-2583
Number of pages2
JournalTransplantation Proceedings
Volume37
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

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Liver Transplantation
Tissue Donors
Transplants
Cold Ischemia
Graft Survival
Liver

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Grazi, G. L., Ravaioli, M., Zanello, M., Ercolani, G., Cescon, M., Varotti, G., ... Pinna, A. D. (2005). Using elderly donors in liver transplantation. Transplantation Proceedings, 37(6), 2582-2583. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.transproceed.2005.06.056

Using elderly donors in liver transplantation. / Grazi, G. L.; Ravaioli, M.; Zanello, M.; Ercolani, G.; Cescon, M.; Varotti, G.; Del Gaudio, M.; Vetrone, G.; Lauro, A.; Ramacciato, G.; Pinna, A. D.

In: Transplantation Proceedings, Vol. 37, No. 6, 2005, p. 2582-2583.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Grazi, GL, Ravaioli, M, Zanello, M, Ercolani, G, Cescon, M, Varotti, G, Del Gaudio, M, Vetrone, G, Lauro, A, Ramacciato, G & Pinna, AD 2005, 'Using elderly donors in liver transplantation', Transplantation Proceedings, vol. 37, no. 6, pp. 2582-2583. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.transproceed.2005.06.056
Grazi GL, Ravaioli M, Zanello M, Ercolani G, Cescon M, Varotti G et al. Using elderly donors in liver transplantation. Transplantation Proceedings. 2005;37(6):2582-2583. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.transproceed.2005.06.056
Grazi, G. L. ; Ravaioli, M. ; Zanello, M. ; Ercolani, G. ; Cescon, M. ; Varotti, G. ; Del Gaudio, M. ; Vetrone, G. ; Lauro, A. ; Ramacciato, G. ; Pinna, A. D. / Using elderly donors in liver transplantation. In: Transplantation Proceedings. 2005 ; Vol. 37, No. 6. pp. 2582-2583.
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abstract = "Aim. Elderly donors are half of the grafts available in our center for liver transplantation. We retrospectively investigated their characteristics, outcomes, and variables related to graft failure. Material and methods. From 1996 to 2003, 540 (46.4{\%}) of 1163 donors were older than 60 years of age and 236 grafts (43.4{\%}) were transplanted, whereas the others were refused. The clinical investigated variables were examined among this cohort. Results. The median age of donors increased from 37 to 62 years. Donors older than 60 years of age were more often refused than younger ones (66{\%} vs 44{\%}); HCV-positive (9.9{\%} vs 5.4{\%}); HbcAb-positive (18.6{\%} vs 12.6{\%}), and steatotic (35.7{\%} vs 13.9{\%}; P <.01). Among donors older than 60 years, the main parameter to refuse the graft was the grade of steatosis. The variables related to the graft loss from donors older than 60 years were as follows: model for end stage liver disease (MELD) recipient >15 (65{\%} vs 39{\%}), cold ischemia time >10 hours (25{\%} vs 13{\%}), high blood losses (3987 ± 4764 vs 2664 ± 2043 mL), and year of liver transplantation after 2000 (26{\%} vs 46{\%}; P <.01). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year graft survival rates were significantly lower among donors older than 60 years than other donors: 75{\%}, 65{\%}, and 62{\%} versus 85{\%}, 83{\%}, and 78{\%}, respectively (P <.001). Conclusion. Donors older than 60 years of age provided liver transplants to half of our recipients. The graft survival rate of these organs was lower than that of younger donors and to improve it the other risk variables for poor outcome should be reduced, including MELD score of the recipient and prolonged cold ischemia time.",
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T1 - Using elderly donors in liver transplantation

AU - Grazi, G. L.

AU - Ravaioli, M.

AU - Zanello, M.

AU - Ercolani, G.

AU - Cescon, M.

AU - Varotti, G.

AU - Del Gaudio, M.

AU - Vetrone, G.

AU - Lauro, A.

AU - Ramacciato, G.

AU - Pinna, A. D.

PY - 2005

Y1 - 2005

N2 - Aim. Elderly donors are half of the grafts available in our center for liver transplantation. We retrospectively investigated their characteristics, outcomes, and variables related to graft failure. Material and methods. From 1996 to 2003, 540 (46.4%) of 1163 donors were older than 60 years of age and 236 grafts (43.4%) were transplanted, whereas the others were refused. The clinical investigated variables were examined among this cohort. Results. The median age of donors increased from 37 to 62 years. Donors older than 60 years of age were more often refused than younger ones (66% vs 44%); HCV-positive (9.9% vs 5.4%); HbcAb-positive (18.6% vs 12.6%), and steatotic (35.7% vs 13.9%; P <.01). Among donors older than 60 years, the main parameter to refuse the graft was the grade of steatosis. The variables related to the graft loss from donors older than 60 years were as follows: model for end stage liver disease (MELD) recipient >15 (65% vs 39%), cold ischemia time >10 hours (25% vs 13%), high blood losses (3987 ± 4764 vs 2664 ± 2043 mL), and year of liver transplantation after 2000 (26% vs 46%; P <.01). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year graft survival rates were significantly lower among donors older than 60 years than other donors: 75%, 65%, and 62% versus 85%, 83%, and 78%, respectively (P <.001). Conclusion. Donors older than 60 years of age provided liver transplants to half of our recipients. The graft survival rate of these organs was lower than that of younger donors and to improve it the other risk variables for poor outcome should be reduced, including MELD score of the recipient and prolonged cold ischemia time.

AB - Aim. Elderly donors are half of the grafts available in our center for liver transplantation. We retrospectively investigated their characteristics, outcomes, and variables related to graft failure. Material and methods. From 1996 to 2003, 540 (46.4%) of 1163 donors were older than 60 years of age and 236 grafts (43.4%) were transplanted, whereas the others were refused. The clinical investigated variables were examined among this cohort. Results. The median age of donors increased from 37 to 62 years. Donors older than 60 years of age were more often refused than younger ones (66% vs 44%); HCV-positive (9.9% vs 5.4%); HbcAb-positive (18.6% vs 12.6%), and steatotic (35.7% vs 13.9%; P <.01). Among donors older than 60 years, the main parameter to refuse the graft was the grade of steatosis. The variables related to the graft loss from donors older than 60 years were as follows: model for end stage liver disease (MELD) recipient >15 (65% vs 39%), cold ischemia time >10 hours (25% vs 13%), high blood losses (3987 ± 4764 vs 2664 ± 2043 mL), and year of liver transplantation after 2000 (26% vs 46%; P <.01). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year graft survival rates were significantly lower among donors older than 60 years than other donors: 75%, 65%, and 62% versus 85%, 83%, and 78%, respectively (P <.001). Conclusion. Donors older than 60 years of age provided liver transplants to half of our recipients. The graft survival rate of these organs was lower than that of younger donors and to improve it the other risk variables for poor outcome should be reduced, including MELD score of the recipient and prolonged cold ischemia time.

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