Vaccination of mice using the west nile virus E-protein in a DNA prime-protein boost strategy stimulates cell-mediated immunity and protects mice against a lethal challenge

Marina De Filette, Silke Soehle, Sebastian Ulbert, Justin Richner, Michael S. Diamond, Alessandro Sinigaglia, Luisa Barzon, Stefan Roels, Julianna Lisziewicz, Orsolya Lorincz, Niek N. Sanders

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that is endemic in Africa, the Middle East, Europe and the United States. There is currently no antiviral treatment or human vaccine available to treat or prevent WNV infection. DNA plasmid-based vaccines represent a new approach for controlling infectious diseases. In rodents, DNA vaccines have been shown to induce B cell and cytotoxic T cell responses and protect against a wide range of infections. In this study, we formulated a plasmid DNA vector expressing the ectodomain of the E-protein of WNV into nanoparticles by using linear polyethyleneimine (lPEI) covalently bound to mannose and examined the potential of this vaccine to protect against lethal WNV infection in mice. Mice were immunized twice (prime - boost regime) with the WNV DNA vaccine formulated with lPEI-mannose using different administration routes (intramuscular, intradermal and topical). In parallel a heterologous boost with purified recombinant WNV envelope (E) protein was evaluated. While no significant E-protein specific humoral response was generated after DNA immunization, protein boosting of DNA-primed mice resulted in a marked increase in total neutralizing antibody titer. In addition, E-specific IL-4 T-cell immune responses were detected by ELISPOT after protein boost and CD8+ specific IFN-γ expression was observed by flow cytometry. Challenge experiments using the heterologous immunization regime revealed protective immunity to homologous and virulent WNV infection.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere87837
JournalPLoS One
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 4 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

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