Vagal stimulation for heart diseases: From animals to men. An example of translational cardiology

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A significant series of experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated the close association between reduced vagal reflexes (baroreflex sensitivity, BRS) and increased sudden and non-sudden cardiovascular mortality. Subsequently, evidence was provided that, also among chronic heart failure (HF) patients, depressed BRS is associated with a poorer outcome. At the same time, the encouraging results with experimental and clinical attempts to increase cardiac vagal activity led to a few experimental studies with vagal stimulation (VS) in different models for HF. We first performed a pilot study for VS in HF patients, and then in 2011 we reported the results of a small size multicentre clinical trial. The 6-month and 1-year results are encouraging for feasibility, safety and appear to have a favourable clinical effect. An ongoing large clinical trial will provide a definitive assessment of the efficacy and usefulness of chronic VS in HF patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)82-84
Number of pages3
JournalNetherlands Heart Journal
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2013

Fingerprint

Cardiology
Heart Diseases
Heart Failure
Baroreflex
Clinical Trials
Multicenter Studies
Reflex
Safety
Mortality

Keywords

  • Autonomic nervous system
  • Baroreflex sensitivity
  • Heart failure
  • Vagal stimulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Vagal stimulation for heart diseases : From animals to men. An example of translational cardiology. / Schwartz, P. J.

In: Netherlands Heart Journal, Vol. 21, No. 2, 02.2013, p. 82-84.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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