Vaginal danazol for women with rectovaginal endometriosis and pain symptoms persisting after insertion of a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device

Simone Ferrero, Daniela Tramalloni, Pier Luigi Venturini, Valentino Remorgida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of treatment with vaginal danazol in improving the pain symptoms caused by rectovaginal endometriosis that persist after insertion of a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device (LNG-IUD). Methods: This pilot observational study included 15 women with rectovaginal endometriosis and pain symptoms persisting after LNG-IUD insertion. Vaginal danazol (100 mg per day) was self-administered for 6 months. The intensity of pain symptoms and the volume of rectovaginal endometriotic nodules were evaluated. Results: Twelve women were satisfied or very satisfied with the treatment. After treatment with vaginal danazol for 3 months, there was a significant decrease in the intensity of pain symptoms compared with their intensity before the administration of danazol. The intensity of pain symptoms decreased further at 6-month follow-up. The volume of the rectovaginal nodules decreased after treatment with vaginal danazol for 6 months (1.7 ± 0.8 cm3) compared with the baseline volume (2.3 ± 0.9 cm 3; P <0.001). Adverse effects of the treatment were minimal and well tolerated. Conclusion: Although a placebo effect cannot be excluded, the results indicate that vaginal danazol decreases the severity of endometriosis-related pain symptoms after LNG-IUD insertion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)116-119
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics
Volume113
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2011

Keywords

  • Danazol
  • Endometriosis
  • Intrauterine device
  • Levonorgestrel
  • Rectovaginal endometriosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

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