Validation of a Neuro Virtual Reality-based version of the multiple errands test for the assessment of executive functions

Simona Raspelli, Federica Pallavicini, Laura Carelli, Francesca Morganti, Barbara Poletti, Barbara Corra, Vincenzo Silani, Giuseppe Riva

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to establish ecological validity and initial construct validity of the Virtual Reality (VR) version of the Multiple Errands Test (MET) (Shallice & Burgess, 1991; Fortin et al., 2003) based on the NeuroVR software as an assessment tool for executive functions. In particular, the MET is an assessment of executive functions in daily life, which consists of tasks that abide by certain rules and is performed in a shopping mall-like setting where items need to be bought and information needs to be obtained. The study population included three groups: post-stroke participants (n = 5), healthy, young participants (n = 5), and healthy, older participants (n = 5). Specific objectives were (1) to examine the relationships between the performance of three groups of participants in the Virtual Multiple Errands Test (VMET) and at the traditional neuropsychological tests employed to assess executive functions and (2) to compare the performance of post-stroke participants to those of healthy, young controls and older controls in the VMET and at the traditional neuropsychological tests employed to assess executive functions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)72-76
Number of pages5
JournalAnnual Review of CyberTherapy and Telemedicine
Volume9
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Keywords

  • Daily life tasks
  • Executive functions
  • Multiple Errands Test (MET)
  • NeuroVR
  • Virtual Reality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Computer Science (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology (miscellaneous)
  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)

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