Validation of the interval deformation technique for compensating soft tissue artefact in human motion analysis

Rita Stagni, Silvia Fantozzi, Angelo Cappello, Alberto Leardini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Soft tissue artefact is the most invalidating source of error in human motion analysis. This error is caused by the erroneous assumption that markers on the skin surface are rigidly connected to the underlying bone. Several methods have been proposed in the literature to compensate for this spurious effect by mathematical modelling of the interposed soft tissues. Validation of these methods has been performed only on simulated data or on a small sample of data acquired from subjects mounting devices which limit skin motion. In the present study, the performance of one of the most recent compensation methods was evaluated using experimental data acquired combining stereophotogrammetry and 3D video-fluoroscopy. The effectiveness of the compensation method was found strongly dependent on the modelling form assumed for the motion of the markers in the bone frame. Even when the compensation produced a significant advantage in the evaluation of bone orientation, the estimation of position was critical.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)293-301
Number of pages9
JournalLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume2673
Publication statusPublished - 2003

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Motion Analysis
Soft Tissue
Artifacts
Bone
Tissue
Interval
Skin
Bone and Bones
Photogrammetry
Mountings
3D Video
Motion
Fluoroscopy
Small Sample
Mathematical Modeling
Research Design
Experimental Data
Equipment and Supplies
Human
Motion analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Theoretical Computer Science

Cite this

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abstract = "Soft tissue artefact is the most invalidating source of error in human motion analysis. This error is caused by the erroneous assumption that markers on the skin surface are rigidly connected to the underlying bone. Several methods have been proposed in the literature to compensate for this spurious effect by mathematical modelling of the interposed soft tissues. Validation of these methods has been performed only on simulated data or on a small sample of data acquired from subjects mounting devices which limit skin motion. In the present study, the performance of one of the most recent compensation methods was evaluated using experimental data acquired combining stereophotogrammetry and 3D video-fluoroscopy. The effectiveness of the compensation method was found strongly dependent on the modelling form assumed for the motion of the markers in the bone frame. Even when the compensation produced a significant advantage in the evaluation of bone orientation, the estimation of position was critical.",
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AB - Soft tissue artefact is the most invalidating source of error in human motion analysis. This error is caused by the erroneous assumption that markers on the skin surface are rigidly connected to the underlying bone. Several methods have been proposed in the literature to compensate for this spurious effect by mathematical modelling of the interposed soft tissues. Validation of these methods has been performed only on simulated data or on a small sample of data acquired from subjects mounting devices which limit skin motion. In the present study, the performance of one of the most recent compensation methods was evaluated using experimental data acquired combining stereophotogrammetry and 3D video-fluoroscopy. The effectiveness of the compensation method was found strongly dependent on the modelling form assumed for the motion of the markers in the bone frame. Even when the compensation produced a significant advantage in the evaluation of bone orientation, the estimation of position was critical.

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