Vascular Function Is Improved After an Environmental Enrichment Program: The Train the Brain-Mind the Vessel Study

Train the Brain Consortium

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Environmental enrichment may slow cognitive decay possibly acting through an improvement in vascular function. Aim of the study was to assess the effects of a 7-month cognitive, social, and physical training program on cognitive and vascular function in patients with mild cognitive impairment. In a single-center, randomized, parallel-group study, 113 patients (age, 65-89 years) were randomized to multidomain training (n=55) or usual care (n=58). All participants underwent neuropsychological tests and vascular evaluation, including brachial artery flow-mediated dilation, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, carotid distensibility, and assessment of circulating hematopoietic CD34+ and endothelial progenitor cells. At study entry, an age-matched control group (n=45) was also studied. Compared with controls, patients had at study entry a reduced flow-mediated dilation (2.97±2.14% versus 3.73±2.06%; P=0.03) and hyperemic stimulus (shear rate area under the curve, 19.1±15.7 versus 25.7±15.1×10-3; P=0.009); only the latter remained significant after adjustment for confounders (P=0.03). Training improved Alzheimer disease assessment scale cognitive (training, 14.0±4.8 to 13.1±5.5; nontraining, 12.1±3.9 to 13.2±4.8; P for interaction visit×training=0.02), flow-mediated dilation (2.82±2.19% to 3.40±1.81%, 3.05±2.08% to 2.24±1.59%; P=0.006; P=0.023 after adjustment for diameter and shear rate area under the curve), and circulating hematopoietic CD34+ cells and prevented the decline in carotid distensibility (18.4±5.3 to 20.0±6.6, 23.9±11.0 to 19.5±7.1 Pa-1; P=0.005). The only clinical predictor of improvement of cognitive function after training was established hypertension. There was no correlation between changes in measures of cognitive and vascular function. In conclusion, a multidomain training program slows cognitive decline, especially in hypertensive individuals. This effect is accompanied by improved systemic endothelial function, mobilization of progenitor CD34+ cells, and preserved carotid distensibility.

CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01725178.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1218-1225
Number of pages8
JournalHypertension
Volume71
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2018
Externally publishedYes

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Blood Vessels
Cognition
Dilatation
Brain
Area Under Curve
Education
Pulse Wave Analysis
Brachial Artery
Neuropsychological Tests
Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Thigh
Alzheimer Disease
Research Design
Stem Cells
Clinical Trials
Hypertension
Control Groups
Cognitive Dysfunction

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Vascular Function Is Improved After an Environmental Enrichment Program : The Train the Brain-Mind the Vessel Study. / Train the Brain Consortium.

In: Hypertension, Vol. 71, No. 6, 06.2018, p. 1218-1225.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Environmental enrichment may slow cognitive decay possibly acting through an improvement in vascular function. Aim of the study was to assess the effects of a 7-month cognitive, social, and physical training program on cognitive and vascular function in patients with mild cognitive impairment. In a single-center, randomized, parallel-group study, 113 patients (age, 65-89 years) were randomized to multidomain training (n=55) or usual care (n=58). All participants underwent neuropsychological tests and vascular evaluation, including brachial artery flow-mediated dilation, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, carotid distensibility, and assessment of circulating hematopoietic CD34+ and endothelial progenitor cells. At study entry, an age-matched control group (n=45) was also studied. Compared with controls, patients had at study entry a reduced flow-mediated dilation (2.97±2.14{\%} versus 3.73±2.06{\%}; P=0.03) and hyperemic stimulus (shear rate area under the curve, 19.1±15.7 versus 25.7±15.1×10-3; P=0.009); only the latter remained significant after adjustment for confounders (P=0.03). Training improved Alzheimer disease assessment scale cognitive (training, 14.0±4.8 to 13.1±5.5; nontraining, 12.1±3.9 to 13.2±4.8; P for interaction visit×training=0.02), flow-mediated dilation (2.82±2.19{\%} to 3.40±1.81{\%}, 3.05±2.08{\%} to 2.24±1.59{\%}; P=0.006; P=0.023 after adjustment for diameter and shear rate area under the curve), and circulating hematopoietic CD34+ cells and prevented the decline in carotid distensibility (18.4±5.3 to 20.0±6.6, 23.9±11.0 to 19.5±7.1 Pa-1; P=0.005). The only clinical predictor of improvement of cognitive function after training was established hypertension. There was no correlation between changes in measures of cognitive and vascular function. In conclusion, a multidomain training program slows cognitive decline, especially in hypertensive individuals. This effect is accompanied by improved systemic endothelial function, mobilization of progenitor CD34+ cells, and preserved carotid distensibility.CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01725178.",
author = "{Train the Brain Consortium} and Bruno, {Rosa Maria} and Francesco Stea and Rosa Sicari and Lorenzo Ghiadoni and Stefano Taddei and Andrea Ungar and Ubaldo Bonuccelli and Gloria Tognoni and Simona Cintoli and {Del Turco}, Serena and Silverio Sbrana and Luna Gargani and Gennaro D'Angelo and Lorenza Pratali and Nicoletta Berardi and Lamberto Maffei and Eugenio Picano",
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pages = "1218--1225",
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T1 - Vascular Function Is Improved After an Environmental Enrichment Program

T2 - The Train the Brain-Mind the Vessel Study

AU - Train the Brain Consortium

AU - Bruno, Rosa Maria

AU - Stea, Francesco

AU - Sicari, Rosa

AU - Ghiadoni, Lorenzo

AU - Taddei, Stefano

AU - Ungar, Andrea

AU - Bonuccelli, Ubaldo

AU - Tognoni, Gloria

AU - Cintoli, Simona

AU - Del Turco, Serena

AU - Sbrana, Silverio

AU - Gargani, Luna

AU - D'Angelo, Gennaro

AU - Pratali, Lorenza

AU - Berardi, Nicoletta

AU - Maffei, Lamberto

AU - Picano, Eugenio

N1 - © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

PY - 2018/6

Y1 - 2018/6

N2 - Environmental enrichment may slow cognitive decay possibly acting through an improvement in vascular function. Aim of the study was to assess the effects of a 7-month cognitive, social, and physical training program on cognitive and vascular function in patients with mild cognitive impairment. In a single-center, randomized, parallel-group study, 113 patients (age, 65-89 years) were randomized to multidomain training (n=55) or usual care (n=58). All participants underwent neuropsychological tests and vascular evaluation, including brachial artery flow-mediated dilation, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, carotid distensibility, and assessment of circulating hematopoietic CD34+ and endothelial progenitor cells. At study entry, an age-matched control group (n=45) was also studied. Compared with controls, patients had at study entry a reduced flow-mediated dilation (2.97±2.14% versus 3.73±2.06%; P=0.03) and hyperemic stimulus (shear rate area under the curve, 19.1±15.7 versus 25.7±15.1×10-3; P=0.009); only the latter remained significant after adjustment for confounders (P=0.03). Training improved Alzheimer disease assessment scale cognitive (training, 14.0±4.8 to 13.1±5.5; nontraining, 12.1±3.9 to 13.2±4.8; P for interaction visit×training=0.02), flow-mediated dilation (2.82±2.19% to 3.40±1.81%, 3.05±2.08% to 2.24±1.59%; P=0.006; P=0.023 after adjustment for diameter and shear rate area under the curve), and circulating hematopoietic CD34+ cells and prevented the decline in carotid distensibility (18.4±5.3 to 20.0±6.6, 23.9±11.0 to 19.5±7.1 Pa-1; P=0.005). The only clinical predictor of improvement of cognitive function after training was established hypertension. There was no correlation between changes in measures of cognitive and vascular function. In conclusion, a multidomain training program slows cognitive decline, especially in hypertensive individuals. This effect is accompanied by improved systemic endothelial function, mobilization of progenitor CD34+ cells, and preserved carotid distensibility.CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01725178.

AB - Environmental enrichment may slow cognitive decay possibly acting through an improvement in vascular function. Aim of the study was to assess the effects of a 7-month cognitive, social, and physical training program on cognitive and vascular function in patients with mild cognitive impairment. In a single-center, randomized, parallel-group study, 113 patients (age, 65-89 years) were randomized to multidomain training (n=55) or usual care (n=58). All participants underwent neuropsychological tests and vascular evaluation, including brachial artery flow-mediated dilation, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, carotid distensibility, and assessment of circulating hematopoietic CD34+ and endothelial progenitor cells. At study entry, an age-matched control group (n=45) was also studied. Compared with controls, patients had at study entry a reduced flow-mediated dilation (2.97±2.14% versus 3.73±2.06%; P=0.03) and hyperemic stimulus (shear rate area under the curve, 19.1±15.7 versus 25.7±15.1×10-3; P=0.009); only the latter remained significant after adjustment for confounders (P=0.03). Training improved Alzheimer disease assessment scale cognitive (training, 14.0±4.8 to 13.1±5.5; nontraining, 12.1±3.9 to 13.2±4.8; P for interaction visit×training=0.02), flow-mediated dilation (2.82±2.19% to 3.40±1.81%, 3.05±2.08% to 2.24±1.59%; P=0.006; P=0.023 after adjustment for diameter and shear rate area under the curve), and circulating hematopoietic CD34+ cells and prevented the decline in carotid distensibility (18.4±5.3 to 20.0±6.6, 23.9±11.0 to 19.5±7.1 Pa-1; P=0.005). The only clinical predictor of improvement of cognitive function after training was established hypertension. There was no correlation between changes in measures of cognitive and vascular function. In conclusion, a multidomain training program slows cognitive decline, especially in hypertensive individuals. This effect is accompanied by improved systemic endothelial function, mobilization of progenitor CD34+ cells, and preserved carotid distensibility.CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01725178.

U2 - 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.117.10066

DO - 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.117.10066

M3 - Article

C2 - 29632101

VL - 71

SP - 1218

EP - 1225

JO - Hypertension

JF - Hypertension

SN - 0194-911X

IS - 6

ER -