Vasopressin levels in Cushing's disease: Inferior petrosal sinus assay, response to corticotrophin-releasing hormone and comparison with patients without Cushing's disease

Annamaria Colao, Diego Ferone, Antonella Di Sarno, Francesca S. Tripodi, Gaetana Cerbone, Paolo Marzullo, Françoise Boudouresque, Charles Oliver, Bartolomeo Merola, Gaetano Lombardi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Higher vasopressin (AVP) levels have been found in the inferior petrosal sinus ipsilateral to the ACTH-secreting adenoma than in the contralateral one, suggesting a potential pathogenetic role of AVP in Cushing's disease. Design: In order to investigate AVP release, plasma ACTH and AVP concentrations were assayed in the inferior petrosal sinuses and in the peripheral blood before and after CRH stimulation. Patients: Twenty patients with Cushings disease and 12 with other pituitary diseases were subjected to simultaneous and bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling for diagnostic purposes. Ten healthy sex and age-matched subjects served as control for peripheral AVP values. Measurements: Plasma ACTH concentrations were measured by RIA using commercial kits. Plasma AVP concentrations were assayed by RIA in acetone extracts of 1-2 ml plasma. Results: Plasma AVP levels in the inferior petrosal sinuses were significantly higher in Cushing's disease than in patients with other pituitary diseases (P

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)157-166
Number of pages10
JournalClinical Endocrinology
Volume45
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1996

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Vasopressin levels in Cushing's disease: Inferior petrosal sinus assay, response to corticotrophin-releasing hormone and comparison with patients without Cushing's disease'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this