Vertical transmission of hepatitis C virus: Investigation on HLA-G and HLA-C genomic polymorphism in 54 mothers and 63 children

M. Asti, C. Badulli, I. Pacati, A. Maccabruni, E. Minola, L. Salvaneschi, M. Cuccia, A. DeSilvestri, M. Martinetti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Mother-to-infant transmission of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV), although uncommon (about 5% of infected pregnancies), represents the major cause of pediatric HCV infection. In the present work we wanted to investigate the role of HLA-G and C molecules in fetal infection. Among 357 pregnancies of HCV-RNA+ mothers, 20 infants (11 females and 9 males) were infected, i.e. steadily positive for HCV-antibody and HCV-RNA over 20 months of age. As a control group we randomly enrolled 43 uninfected babies, born to HCV-RNA+ mothers, but steadily negative for HCV-RNA during a follow-up of 2 years. All subjects (54 mothers and 63 children) underwent genomic typing for HLA-C polymorphism using the PCR-SSP technique. PCR-RFLP technique was used for HLA-G typing. The following HLA-G alleles were found: HLA-G*01011, 01012, 01013 and 0105N. HLA-G*01012 was more frequent in HCV positive babies (55%) than in negative ones (40.2%), than in mothers (36.6%) and in blood donors (35.8%). HLA-G*01012 was particularly present in infected males (66.6%). On the contrary, HLA-G*01011 was more represented in HCV negative babies (49% vs 40%). The null allele G*0105N was more frequent among HCV positive mothers than in controls (4.45% vs 1.85%) but it was equally highly distributed among the children (5% in positive and 4.6% in negative ones). HLA-Cw*07 frequency was 35% in HCV positive babies and 19.8% in HCV negative babies, 23% in mothers and 24% in blood donors. HLA-C alleles were divided in two groups according to the dimorphism at 77 and 80 amino acid residues: SN vs NK. The SN/NK. heterozygous genotype was prevalent among HCV uninfected babies (44.19% vs 25%) while SN homozygous genotype was more frequent in HCV+ babies (50% vs 32%). No linkage disequilibrium was observed between HLA-C and HLA-G alleles in this sample so their contribute might be independent.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)293
Number of pages1
JournalEuropean Journal of Immunogenetics
Volume28
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2001

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HLA-G Antigens
HLA-C Antigens
Hepacivirus
Mothers
Alleles
RNA
Blood Donors
Genotype
Pregnancy
Histocompatibility Testing
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Hepatitis C Antibodies
Linkage Disequilibrium
Virus Diseases
Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Asti, M., Badulli, C., Pacati, I., Maccabruni, A., Minola, E., Salvaneschi, L., ... Martinetti, M. (2001). Vertical transmission of hepatitis C virus: Investigation on HLA-G and HLA-C genomic polymorphism in 54 mothers and 63 children. European Journal of Immunogenetics, 28(2), 293.

Vertical transmission of hepatitis C virus : Investigation on HLA-G and HLA-C genomic polymorphism in 54 mothers and 63 children. / Asti, M.; Badulli, C.; Pacati, I.; Maccabruni, A.; Minola, E.; Salvaneschi, L.; Cuccia, M.; DeSilvestri, A.; Martinetti, M.

In: European Journal of Immunogenetics, Vol. 28, No. 2, 2001, p. 293.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Asti, M, Badulli, C, Pacati, I, Maccabruni, A, Minola, E, Salvaneschi, L, Cuccia, M, DeSilvestri, A & Martinetti, M 2001, 'Vertical transmission of hepatitis C virus: Investigation on HLA-G and HLA-C genomic polymorphism in 54 mothers and 63 children', European Journal of Immunogenetics, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 293.
Asti, M. ; Badulli, C. ; Pacati, I. ; Maccabruni, A. ; Minola, E. ; Salvaneschi, L. ; Cuccia, M. ; DeSilvestri, A. ; Martinetti, M. / Vertical transmission of hepatitis C virus : Investigation on HLA-G and HLA-C genomic polymorphism in 54 mothers and 63 children. In: European Journal of Immunogenetics. 2001 ; Vol. 28, No. 2. pp. 293.
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AU - Maccabruni, A.

AU - Minola, E.

AU - Salvaneschi, L.

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