Violence in video game produces a lower activation of limbic and temporal areas in response to social inclusion images

Carlo Lai, Gaia Romana Pellicano, Daniela Altavilla, Alessio Proietti, Giada Lucarelli, Giuseppe Massaro, Massimiliano Luciani, Paola Aceto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Exposure to violence in video games has been associated with a desensitization toward violent content, a decrease of empathy, and prosocial behavior. Moreover, violent video games seem to be related to a reduction of neural activation in the circuits linked to social emotional processing. The purpose of the present study was to compare the neural response to social inclusion images after violent and nonviolent video game playing. Electroencephalographic data of the 32 participants were recorded during a visual task with three presentations (T0, T1, T2) of 60 stimuli (30 social inclusion vs. 30 neutral images). After the T0 presentation, the participants played with a video game (orientation or violent). After the T1 presentation, the participants played with the other video game (orientation or violent). The two types of video games were randomly displayed. Event-related potential (ERP) components and low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA) were analyzed. The main findings showed a longer latency of the P2 component on occipito-temporal montage and a lower activation of the limbic and temporal areas in response to the social inclusion images post violent video game compared with the post orientation video game. The findings suggest a reduction of emotional engagement in social processing after playing violent video game.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Video Games
Violence
Electromagnetic Phenomena
Evoked Potentials
Tomography

Keywords

  • Event-related potential
  • sLoreta
  • Social inclusion
  • Violent video game

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Violence in video game produces a lower activation of limbic and temporal areas in response to social inclusion images. / Lai, Carlo; Pellicano, Gaia Romana; Altavilla, Daniela; Proietti, Alessio; Lucarelli, Giada; Massaro, Giuseppe; Luciani, Massimiliano; Aceto, Paola.

In: Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lai, Carlo ; Pellicano, Gaia Romana ; Altavilla, Daniela ; Proietti, Alessio ; Lucarelli, Giada ; Massaro, Giuseppe ; Luciani, Massimiliano ; Aceto, Paola. / Violence in video game produces a lower activation of limbic and temporal areas in response to social inclusion images. In: Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience. 2018.
@article{c4c5014336154992864d0e00afc2f46a,
title = "Violence in video game produces a lower activation of limbic and temporal areas in response to social inclusion images",
abstract = "Exposure to violence in video games has been associated with a desensitization toward violent content, a decrease of empathy, and prosocial behavior. Moreover, violent video games seem to be related to a reduction of neural activation in the circuits linked to social emotional processing. The purpose of the present study was to compare the neural response to social inclusion images after violent and nonviolent video game playing. Electroencephalographic data of the 32 participants were recorded during a visual task with three presentations (T0, T1, T2) of 60 stimuli (30 social inclusion vs. 30 neutral images). After the T0 presentation, the participants played with a video game (orientation or violent). After the T1 presentation, the participants played with the other video game (orientation or violent). The two types of video games were randomly displayed. Event-related potential (ERP) components and low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA) were analyzed. The main findings showed a longer latency of the P2 component on occipito-temporal montage and a lower activation of the limbic and temporal areas in response to the social inclusion images post violent video game compared with the post orientation video game. The findings suggest a reduction of emotional engagement in social processing after playing violent video game.",
keywords = "Event-related potential, sLoreta, Social inclusion, Violent video game",
author = "Carlo Lai and Pellicano, {Gaia Romana} and Daniela Altavilla and Alessio Proietti and Giada Lucarelli and Giuseppe Massaro and Massimiliano Luciani and Paola Aceto",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3758/s13415-018-00683-y",
language = "English",
journal = "Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience",
issn = "1530-7026",
publisher = "Springer New York",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Violence in video game produces a lower activation of limbic and temporal areas in response to social inclusion images

AU - Lai, Carlo

AU - Pellicano, Gaia Romana

AU - Altavilla, Daniela

AU - Proietti, Alessio

AU - Lucarelli, Giada

AU - Massaro, Giuseppe

AU - Luciani, Massimiliano

AU - Aceto, Paola

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Exposure to violence in video games has been associated with a desensitization toward violent content, a decrease of empathy, and prosocial behavior. Moreover, violent video games seem to be related to a reduction of neural activation in the circuits linked to social emotional processing. The purpose of the present study was to compare the neural response to social inclusion images after violent and nonviolent video game playing. Electroencephalographic data of the 32 participants were recorded during a visual task with three presentations (T0, T1, T2) of 60 stimuli (30 social inclusion vs. 30 neutral images). After the T0 presentation, the participants played with a video game (orientation or violent). After the T1 presentation, the participants played with the other video game (orientation or violent). The two types of video games were randomly displayed. Event-related potential (ERP) components and low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA) were analyzed. The main findings showed a longer latency of the P2 component on occipito-temporal montage and a lower activation of the limbic and temporal areas in response to the social inclusion images post violent video game compared with the post orientation video game. The findings suggest a reduction of emotional engagement in social processing after playing violent video game.

AB - Exposure to violence in video games has been associated with a desensitization toward violent content, a decrease of empathy, and prosocial behavior. Moreover, violent video games seem to be related to a reduction of neural activation in the circuits linked to social emotional processing. The purpose of the present study was to compare the neural response to social inclusion images after violent and nonviolent video game playing. Electroencephalographic data of the 32 participants were recorded during a visual task with three presentations (T0, T1, T2) of 60 stimuli (30 social inclusion vs. 30 neutral images). After the T0 presentation, the participants played with a video game (orientation or violent). After the T1 presentation, the participants played with the other video game (orientation or violent). The two types of video games were randomly displayed. Event-related potential (ERP) components and low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA) were analyzed. The main findings showed a longer latency of the P2 component on occipito-temporal montage and a lower activation of the limbic and temporal areas in response to the social inclusion images post violent video game compared with the post orientation video game. The findings suggest a reduction of emotional engagement in social processing after playing violent video game.

KW - Event-related potential

KW - sLoreta

KW - Social inclusion

KW - Violent video game

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85058969328&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85058969328&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3758/s13415-018-00683-y

DO - 10.3758/s13415-018-00683-y

M3 - Article

JO - Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience

JF - Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience

SN - 1530-7026

ER -