Virus-like particles as particulate vaccines

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Particulate structures hold great promise for the development of effective and affordable recombinant prophylactic as well as therapeutic vaccines. Different types of particulate structures, including virus-like particles (VLPs) and virosomes, have been developed depending on the nature of the viral pathogen to be targeted and the type of immune response (humoral vs cellular) to be elicited. Particulate structures allow the insertion or fusion of foreign antigenic sequences, resulting in chimeric particles delivering foreign antigens on their surface. Similarly, they are used as carriers for foreign antigens, including non-protein antigens, via chemical conjugation. Particulate structures, indeed, represent a very efficient system for delivering antigens to antigen presenting cells (APC) which, in turn, trigger and amplify the adaptive immune response. The present review will address the biological and immunological properties of particulate structures, in particular VLPs, as platform for vaccine development.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)299-309
Number of pages11
JournalCurrent HIV Research
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Virion
Vaccines
Antigens
Virosomes
Adaptive Immunity
Antigen-Presenting Cells
Humoral Immunity
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Adaptive immunity
  • Antigen-presenting cells
  • Hiv
  • Innate immunity
  • Vaccine
  • Virus-like particles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

Cite this

Virus-like particles as particulate vaccines. / Buonaguro, Luigi; Tornesello, Maria L.; Buonaguro, Franco M.

In: Current HIV Research, Vol. 8, No. 4, 2010, p. 299-309.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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