Vitamin D deficiency does not affect the likelihood of presurgical localization in asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism

Francesco Tassone, Elena Castellano, Laura Gianotti, Franco Acchiardi, Ignazio Emmolo, Roberto Attanasio, Giorgio Borretta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Vitamin D deficiency (VDD) was previously associated with larger adenoma size in primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT), but this topic was not addressed in patients with the mild/asymptomatic form of the disease (aPHPT). Methods: We retrospectively retrieved from our series of patients affected by PHPT, 96 consecutive subjects with aPHPT in whom 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) levels had been assayed and compared those results with localizing imaging studies. Results: Twenty-five of 96 patients had VDD (25OHD <20 ng/mL), but positive ultrasound and scintigraphic studies were not different between patients with and without VDD (52.3% versus 55.7% and 42.9% versus 52.4%, respectively). Upon logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for different variables, including the presence of goiter, VDD was not an independent predictor of localization by imaging studies. Conclusion: VDD does not affect the likelihood of positive pre-operative imaging in aPHPT and the consequent surgical decisions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)205-209
Number of pages5
JournalEndocrine Practice
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

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    Tassone, F., Castellano, E., Gianotti, L., Acchiardi, F., Emmolo, I., Attanasio, R., & Borretta, G. (2016). Vitamin D deficiency does not affect the likelihood of presurgical localization in asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism. Endocrine Practice, 22(2), 205-209. https://doi.org/10.4158/EP15977.OR