Vitamin e and enzymatic/oxidative stress-driven oxysterols in amnestic mild cognitive impairment subtypes and Alzheimer's disease

Luigi Iuliano, Roberto Monticolo, Giuseppe Straface, Ilaria Spoletini, Walter Gianni, Carlo Caltagirone, Paola Bossù, Gianfranco Spalletta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Oxidative stress, which contributes to neuronal damage, is thought to be a pathophysiological mechanism of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Markers of oxidative stress may appear early in the preclinical, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) phase of AD. We investigated the interaction among enzymatic-derived oxysterols (24S-hydroxycholesterol and 27-hydroxycholesterol), markers of oxidative stress, including free radical-related oxysterols (7β-hydroxycholesterol and 7-ketocholesterol), and vitamin E in AD patients and two amnestic MCI subtypes, amnestic single-domain MCI (a-MCI) subjects, and multi-domain MCI (md-MCI) subjects, compared to healthy control subjects (HC). The study included 37 patients with AD, 24 with a-MCI, 29 with md-MCI, and 24 HC. Plasma assessments were made using isotope dilution-mass spectrometry. Although we found no significant change in free radical- or enzymatic-derived oxysterol concentrations in AD or MCI patients, vitamin E levels corrected for cholesterol were reduced in AD patients compared to HC. Results suggest that AD patients have upregulated cerebral oxidative stress or a nutritional deficit of vitamin E. The oxysterols investigated here are not useful markers for diagnosing AD or MCI.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1383-1392
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • amnestic
  • cholesterol
  • mild cognitive impairment
  • oxysterols
  • vitamin E

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Clinical Psychology

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