Vitamin K uptake in hepatocytes and hepatoma cells

Zhong Qian Li, Feng Yun He, Christine J. Stehle, Ziqiu Wang, Siddhartha Kar, Frances M. Finn, Brian I. Carr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or hepatoma cells have impaired ability to perform vitamin K-dependent carboxylation reactions. Vitamin K can also inhibit growth of HCC cells in vitro. Both carboxylation and growth inhibition are vitamin K dose dependent. We used rat hepatocytes, a vitamin K-growth sensitive (MH7777) and a vitamin K-growth resistant (H4IIE) rat hepatoma cell line to examine vitamin K uptake and vitamin K-mediated microsomal carboxylation. We found that vitamin K is taken up by normal rat hepatocytes against a saturable concentration gradient. The relative rates of uptake by rat hepatocytes and the two rat cell lines MH7777 and H4IIE correlated with their sensitivity to vitamin K-mediated cell growth inhibition. Pooled hepatocytes from liver nodules from rats treated with the hepatocarcinogen diethylnitrosamine (DEN) also had a reduced rate of vitamin K uptake. However, using a cell-free system, microsomes from both normal rat hepatocytes and the two rat hepatoma cell lines had a similar ability to support carboxylation mediated by exogenously added vitamin K. The results support the hypothesis that different sensitivity of hepatoma cells to vitamin K may be due to differences in vitamin K uptake and may be unrelated to the actions of vitamin K on carboxylation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2085-2100
Number of pages16
JournalLife Sciences
Volume70
Issue number18
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 22 2002

Fingerprint

Vitamin K
Hepatocytes
Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Carboxylation
Rats
Growth
Cells
Cell Line
Diethylnitrosamine
Cell-Free System
Cell growth
Microsomes
Liver

Keywords

  • Carboxylation
  • Growth inhibition
  • K vitamins
  • Menaquinone
  • Transport

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Li, Z. Q., He, F. Y., Stehle, C. J., Wang, Z., Kar, S., Finn, F. M., & Carr, B. I. (2002). Vitamin K uptake in hepatocytes and hepatoma cells. Life Sciences, 70(18), 2085-2100. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0024-3205(01)01525-9

Vitamin K uptake in hepatocytes and hepatoma cells. / Li, Zhong Qian; He, Feng Yun; Stehle, Christine J.; Wang, Ziqiu; Kar, Siddhartha; Finn, Frances M.; Carr, Brian I.

In: Life Sciences, Vol. 70, No. 18, 22.03.2002, p. 2085-2100.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Li, ZQ, He, FY, Stehle, CJ, Wang, Z, Kar, S, Finn, FM & Carr, BI 2002, 'Vitamin K uptake in hepatocytes and hepatoma cells', Life Sciences, vol. 70, no. 18, pp. 2085-2100. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0024-3205(01)01525-9
Li ZQ, He FY, Stehle CJ, Wang Z, Kar S, Finn FM et al. Vitamin K uptake in hepatocytes and hepatoma cells. Life Sciences. 2002 Mar 22;70(18):2085-2100. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0024-3205(01)01525-9
Li, Zhong Qian ; He, Feng Yun ; Stehle, Christine J. ; Wang, Ziqiu ; Kar, Siddhartha ; Finn, Frances M. ; Carr, Brian I. / Vitamin K uptake in hepatocytes and hepatoma cells. In: Life Sciences. 2002 ; Vol. 70, No. 18. pp. 2085-2100.
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