Vocal cord paralysis appears to be an acquired lesion in children with repaired esophageal atresia/tracheoesophageal fistula

Thomas Kovesi, Federica Porcaro, Francesca Petreschi, Marilena Trozzi, Sergio Bottero, Renato Cutrera

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Determine whether vocal cord paresis or paralysis (VCP/P) following surgical repair of congenital esophageal atresia/tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) is generally a primary anomaly, or is secondary to EA/TEF repair.

METHODS: We carried out a retrospective study based on a recently published protocol, which included the systematic performance of a laryngo-tracheo-bronchoscopy before and after EA/TEF repair.

RESULTS: There were 105 patients with EA/TEF referred for multidisciplinary follow-up, between 2010 and 2015. Sixty-four of the 105 patients included in the study underwent EA/TEF repair at the referral center and had pre-operative bronchoscopy; the others had their initial surgery elsewhere. No included patient had VCP/P detected pre-operatively. Six patients (4 initially managed at the referral center) were diagnosed with VCP/P during the follow-up period (6/105, 5.7%).

CONCLUSION: VCP appears to be an acquired lesion in this population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)45-47
Number of pages3
JournalInternational Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Volume112
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2018

Keywords

  • Bronchoscopy
  • Child, Preschool
  • Esophageal Atresia/surgery
  • Female
  • Follow-Up Studies
  • Humans
  • Infant
  • Infant, Newborn
  • Male
  • Postoperative Complications/diagnostic imaging
  • Retrospective Studies
  • Tracheoesophageal Fistula/surgery
  • Treatment Outcome
  • Vocal Cord Paralysis/diagnostic imaging

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