Voxel-based assessment of differences in damage and distribution of white matter lesions between patients with primary progressive and relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

Carol Di Perri, Marco Battaglini, Maria L. Stromillo, Maria L. Bartolozzi, Leonello Guidi, Antonio Federico, Nicola De Stefano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Several studies have reported lower focal demyelination and inflammatory activity in primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) than in relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS). However, very little is known about possible differences in damage and distribution that may occur within lesions visible on magnetic resonance imaging in the 2 forms of the disease. Objective: To evaluate differences in spatial distribution and structural damage of focal demyelinating lesions in patients with PPMS and RRMS. Design: We acquired conventional magnetic resonance and magnetization transfer images in 24 PPMS and 36 RRMS patients (matched for sex, age, and disease duration) and 23 healthy sex- and age-matched controls. In each participant, we measured T2- and T1-weighted lesion volumes and magnetization transfer ratios in lesional and nonlesional brain tissues. The spatial distribution of focal demyelination was assessed using T2- and T1-weighted lesion probability maps in each patient group. Voxel-based procedures were performed. Setting: University hospital. Results: Patients with PPMS had greater disability than those with RRMS, with 70% of PPMS patients and 11% of RRMS patients having relevant motor symptoms. The T1- and T2-weighted lesion volumes were higher in PPMS than in RRMS patients (P

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)236-243
Number of pages8
JournalArchives of Neurology
Volume65
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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