Walking index for spinal cord injury version II in acute spinal cord injury: Reliability and reproducibility

G. Scivoletto, F. Tamburella, L. Laurenza, M. Torre, M. Molinari, J. F. Ditunno

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Study design:Administration of the walking index for SCI (WISCI) II is recommended to assess walking in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. Determining the reliability and reproducibility of the WISCI II in acute SCI would be invaluable.Objectives:The objective of this study is to assess the reliability and reproducibility of the WISCI II in patients with traumatic, acute SCI.Design:Test-retest analysis and calculation of reliability and smallest real difference (SRD).Setting:SCI unit of a rehabilitation hospital.Methods:Thirty- three patients, median age 44 years, median time since onset of SCI 40 days. Level: 20 cervical, 8 thoracic, 5 lumbar; ASIA (American Spinal Injury Association) impairment scale (AIS) grade: 32 D/1 C. Assessment of maximum WISCI II levels by two trained, blinded raters to evaluate interrater (IRR) and intrarater reliability.Results:The intrarater reliability was 0.999 for therapists A and 0.979 for therapists B, for the maximum WISCI II level. The IRR for the maximum WISCI II score was 0.996 on day 1 and 0.975 on day 2. The SRD for the maximum WISCI II score was 1.147 for tetraplegics and 1.682 for paraplegics. These results suggest that a change of two WISCI II levels could be considered real.Conclusions:The WISCI II has high IRR and intrarater reliability and good reproducibility in the acute and subacute phase when administered by trained raters.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)65-69
Number of pages5
JournalSpinal Cord
Volume52
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2014

Keywords

  • reliability
  • reproducibility
  • spinal cord injury
  • walking
  • WISCI II

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

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