Weight loss, exercise, or both and physical function in obese older adults

Dennis T. Villareal, Suresh Chode, Nehu Parimi, David R. Sinacore, Tiffany Hilton, Reina Armamento-Villareal, Nicola Napoli, Clifford Qualls, Krupa Shah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Obesity exacerbates the age-related decline in physical function and causes frailty in older adults; however, the appropriate treatment for obese older adults is controversial. Methods: In this 1-year, randomized, controlled trial, we evaluated the independent and combined effects of weight loss and exercise in 107 adults who were 65 years of age or older and obese. Participants were randomly assigned to a control group, a weight-management (diet) group, an exercise group, or a weight-management-plus-exercise (diet-exercise) group. The primary outcome was the change in score on the modified Physical Performance Test. Secondary outcomes included other measures of frailty, body composition, bone mineral density, specific physical functions, and quality of life. Results: A total of 93 participants (87%) completed the study. In the intention-to-treat analysis, the score on the Physical Performance Test, in which higher scores indicate better physical status, increased more in the diet-exercise group than in the diet group or the exercise group (increases from baseline of 21% vs. 12% and 15%, respectively); the scores in all three of those groups increased more than the scores in the control group (in which the score increased by 1%) (P

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1218-1229
Number of pages12
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume364
Issue number13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 31 2011

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Weight Loss
Diet
Weights and Measures
Control Groups
Intention to Treat Analysis
Body Composition
Bone Density
Randomized Controlled Trials
Obesity
Quality of Life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Villareal, D. T., Chode, S., Parimi, N., Sinacore, D. R., Hilton, T., Armamento-Villareal, R., ... Shah, K. (2011). Weight loss, exercise, or both and physical function in obese older adults. New England Journal of Medicine, 364(13), 1218-1229. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1008234

Weight loss, exercise, or both and physical function in obese older adults. / Villareal, Dennis T.; Chode, Suresh; Parimi, Nehu; Sinacore, David R.; Hilton, Tiffany; Armamento-Villareal, Reina; Napoli, Nicola; Qualls, Clifford; Shah, Krupa.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 364, No. 13, 31.03.2011, p. 1218-1229.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Villareal, DT, Chode, S, Parimi, N, Sinacore, DR, Hilton, T, Armamento-Villareal, R, Napoli, N, Qualls, C & Shah, K 2011, 'Weight loss, exercise, or both and physical function in obese older adults', New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 364, no. 13, pp. 1218-1229. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1008234
Villareal DT, Chode S, Parimi N, Sinacore DR, Hilton T, Armamento-Villareal R et al. Weight loss, exercise, or both and physical function in obese older adults. New England Journal of Medicine. 2011 Mar 31;364(13):1218-1229. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1008234
Villareal, Dennis T. ; Chode, Suresh ; Parimi, Nehu ; Sinacore, David R. ; Hilton, Tiffany ; Armamento-Villareal, Reina ; Napoli, Nicola ; Qualls, Clifford ; Shah, Krupa. / Weight loss, exercise, or both and physical function in obese older adults. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 364, No. 13. pp. 1218-1229.
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