What do European women know about their female cancer risks and cancer screening?

A cross-sectional online intervention survey in five European countries

FORECEE (4C) consortium

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Informed decisions about cancer screening require accurate knowledge regarding cancer risks and screening. This study investigates: (1) European women's knowledge of their risk of developing breast, ovarian, cervical or endometrial cancer, (2) their knowledge about mammography screening and (3) whether an evidence-based leaflet improves their knowledge.

DESIGN: Cross-sectional online intervention survey.

SETTING: National samples from five European countries (Czech Republic, Germany, UK, Italy and Sweden)-drawn from the Harris Interactive and the Toluna panel, respectively, in January 2017-were queried on their knowledge of age-specific risks of developing breast, cervical, ovarian or endometrial cancer within the next 10 years and of mammography screening before and after intervention.

PARTICIPANTS: Of 3629 women (inclusion criteria: age 40-75 years) invited, 2092 responded and 1675 completed the survey (response rate: 61.4%).

INTERVENTION: Evidence-based leaflet summarising information on age-adjusted female cancer risks, mammography and aspects of cancer prevention.

PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportion of women (1) accurately estimating their risk of four female cancers, (2) holding correct assumptions of mammography screening and (3) changing their estimations and assumptions after exposure to leaflet.

FINDINGS: Across countries, 59.2% (95% CI 56.8% to 61.6%) to 91.8% (95% CI 90.3% to 93.0%) overestimated their female cancer risks 7-33 fold (mediansacross tumours: 50.0 to 200.0). 26.5% (95% CI 24.4% to 28.7%) were aware that mammography screening has both benefits and harms. Women who accurately estimated their breast cancer risk were less likely to believe that mammography prevents cancer (p<0.001). After leaflet intervention, knowledge of cancer risks improved by 27.0 (95% CI 24.9 to 29.2) to 37.1 (95% CI 34.8 to 39.4) percentage points and of mammography by 23.0 (95% CI 21.0 to 25.1) percentage points.

CONCLUSION: A considerable number of women in five European countries may not possess the prerequisites for an informed choice on cancer screening. Evidence-based information in patient leaflets can improve this situation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e023789
JournalBMJ Open
Volume8
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 28 2018

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Early Detection of Cancer
Mammography
Neoplasms
Endometrial Neoplasms
Breast Neoplasms
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Ovarian Neoplasms
Surveys and Questionnaires
Czech Republic
Sweden
Italy
Germany

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What do European women know about their female cancer risks and cancer screening? A cross-sectional online intervention survey in five European countries. / FORECEE (4C) consortium.

In: BMJ Open, Vol. 8, No. 12, 28.12.2018, p. e023789.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "What do European women know about their female cancer risks and cancer screening?: A cross-sectional online intervention survey in five European countries",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: Informed decisions about cancer screening require accurate knowledge regarding cancer risks and screening. This study investigates: (1) European women's knowledge of their risk of developing breast, ovarian, cervical or endometrial cancer, (2) their knowledge about mammography screening and (3) whether an evidence-based leaflet improves their knowledge.DESIGN: Cross-sectional online intervention survey.SETTING: National samples from five European countries (Czech Republic, Germany, UK, Italy and Sweden)-drawn from the Harris Interactive and the Toluna panel, respectively, in January 2017-were queried on their knowledge of age-specific risks of developing breast, cervical, ovarian or endometrial cancer within the next 10 years and of mammography screening before and after intervention.PARTICIPANTS: Of 3629 women (inclusion criteria: age 40-75 years) invited, 2092 responded and 1675 completed the survey (response rate: 61.4{\%}).INTERVENTION: Evidence-based leaflet summarising information on age-adjusted female cancer risks, mammography and aspects of cancer prevention.PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportion of women (1) accurately estimating their risk of four female cancers, (2) holding correct assumptions of mammography screening and (3) changing their estimations and assumptions after exposure to leaflet.FINDINGS: Across countries, 59.2{\%} (95{\%} CI 56.8{\%} to 61.6{\%}) to 91.8{\%} (95{\%} CI 90.3{\%} to 93.0{\%}) overestimated their female cancer risks 7-33 fold (mediansacross tumours: 50.0 to 200.0). 26.5{\%} (95{\%} CI 24.4{\%} to 28.7{\%}) were aware that mammography screening has both benefits and harms. Women who accurately estimated their breast cancer risk were less likely to believe that mammography prevents cancer (p<0.001). After leaflet intervention, knowledge of cancer risks improved by 27.0 (95{\%} CI 24.9 to 29.2) to 37.1 (95{\%} CI 34.8 to 39.4) percentage points and of mammography by 23.0 (95{\%} CI 21.0 to 25.1) percentage points.CONCLUSION: A considerable number of women in five European countries may not possess the prerequisites for an informed choice on cancer screening. Evidence-based information in patient leaflets can improve this situation.",
author = "{FORECEE (4C) consortium} and Odette Wegwarth and Martin Widschwendter and David Cibula and Karin Sundstr{\"o}m and Rosalba Portuesi and Ines Lein and Rebitschek, {Felix G}",
note = "{\circledC} Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2018. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.",
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T1 - What do European women know about their female cancer risks and cancer screening?

T2 - A cross-sectional online intervention survey in five European countries

AU - FORECEE (4C) consortium

AU - Wegwarth, Odette

AU - Widschwendter, Martin

AU - Cibula, David

AU - Sundström, Karin

AU - Portuesi, Rosalba

AU - Lein, Ines

AU - Rebitschek, Felix G

N1 - © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2018. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

PY - 2018/12/28

Y1 - 2018/12/28

N2 - OBJECTIVES: Informed decisions about cancer screening require accurate knowledge regarding cancer risks and screening. This study investigates: (1) European women's knowledge of their risk of developing breast, ovarian, cervical or endometrial cancer, (2) their knowledge about mammography screening and (3) whether an evidence-based leaflet improves their knowledge.DESIGN: Cross-sectional online intervention survey.SETTING: National samples from five European countries (Czech Republic, Germany, UK, Italy and Sweden)-drawn from the Harris Interactive and the Toluna panel, respectively, in January 2017-were queried on their knowledge of age-specific risks of developing breast, cervical, ovarian or endometrial cancer within the next 10 years and of mammography screening before and after intervention.PARTICIPANTS: Of 3629 women (inclusion criteria: age 40-75 years) invited, 2092 responded and 1675 completed the survey (response rate: 61.4%).INTERVENTION: Evidence-based leaflet summarising information on age-adjusted female cancer risks, mammography and aspects of cancer prevention.PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportion of women (1) accurately estimating their risk of four female cancers, (2) holding correct assumptions of mammography screening and (3) changing their estimations and assumptions after exposure to leaflet.FINDINGS: Across countries, 59.2% (95% CI 56.8% to 61.6%) to 91.8% (95% CI 90.3% to 93.0%) overestimated their female cancer risks 7-33 fold (mediansacross tumours: 50.0 to 200.0). 26.5% (95% CI 24.4% to 28.7%) were aware that mammography screening has both benefits and harms. Women who accurately estimated their breast cancer risk were less likely to believe that mammography prevents cancer (p<0.001). After leaflet intervention, knowledge of cancer risks improved by 27.0 (95% CI 24.9 to 29.2) to 37.1 (95% CI 34.8 to 39.4) percentage points and of mammography by 23.0 (95% CI 21.0 to 25.1) percentage points.CONCLUSION: A considerable number of women in five European countries may not possess the prerequisites for an informed choice on cancer screening. Evidence-based information in patient leaflets can improve this situation.

AB - OBJECTIVES: Informed decisions about cancer screening require accurate knowledge regarding cancer risks and screening. This study investigates: (1) European women's knowledge of their risk of developing breast, ovarian, cervical or endometrial cancer, (2) their knowledge about mammography screening and (3) whether an evidence-based leaflet improves their knowledge.DESIGN: Cross-sectional online intervention survey.SETTING: National samples from five European countries (Czech Republic, Germany, UK, Italy and Sweden)-drawn from the Harris Interactive and the Toluna panel, respectively, in January 2017-were queried on their knowledge of age-specific risks of developing breast, cervical, ovarian or endometrial cancer within the next 10 years and of mammography screening before and after intervention.PARTICIPANTS: Of 3629 women (inclusion criteria: age 40-75 years) invited, 2092 responded and 1675 completed the survey (response rate: 61.4%).INTERVENTION: Evidence-based leaflet summarising information on age-adjusted female cancer risks, mammography and aspects of cancer prevention.PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportion of women (1) accurately estimating their risk of four female cancers, (2) holding correct assumptions of mammography screening and (3) changing their estimations and assumptions after exposure to leaflet.FINDINGS: Across countries, 59.2% (95% CI 56.8% to 61.6%) to 91.8% (95% CI 90.3% to 93.0%) overestimated their female cancer risks 7-33 fold (mediansacross tumours: 50.0 to 200.0). 26.5% (95% CI 24.4% to 28.7%) were aware that mammography screening has both benefits and harms. Women who accurately estimated their breast cancer risk were less likely to believe that mammography prevents cancer (p<0.001). After leaflet intervention, knowledge of cancer risks improved by 27.0 (95% CI 24.9 to 29.2) to 37.1 (95% CI 34.8 to 39.4) percentage points and of mammography by 23.0 (95% CI 21.0 to 25.1) percentage points.CONCLUSION: A considerable number of women in five European countries may not possess the prerequisites for an informed choice on cancer screening. Evidence-based information in patient leaflets can improve this situation.

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DO - 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-023789

M3 - Article

VL - 8

SP - e023789

JO - BMJ Open

JF - BMJ Open

SN - 2044-6055

IS - 12

ER -