What do we know about pre- and postoperative plasticity in patients with glioma? A review of neuroimaging and intraoperative mapping studies

Elisa Cargnelutti, Tamara Ius, Miran Skrap, Barbara Tomasino

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Brain plasticity potential is a central theme in neuro-oncology and is currently receiving increased attention. Advances in treatment have prolonged life expectancy in neuro-oncological patients and the long-term preservation of their quality of life is, therefore, a new challenge. To this end, a better understanding of brain plasticity mechanisms is vital as it can help prevent permanent deficits following neurosurgery. Indeed, reorganization processes can be fundamental to prevent or recover neurological and cognitive deficits by reallocating brain functions outside the lesioned areas. According to more recent studies in the literature, brain reorganization taking place following neurosurgery is associated with good neurofunctioning at follow-up. Interestingly, in the last few years, the number of reports on plasticity has notably increased. Aim of the current review was to provide a comprehensive overview of pre- and postoperative neuroplasticity patterns. Within this framework, we aimed to shed light on some tricky issues, including i) involvement of the contralateral healthy hemisphere, ii) role and potential changes of white matter and connectivity patterns, and iii) reorganization in low- versus high-grade gliomas. We finally discussed the practical implications of these aspects and role of additional potentially relevant factors to be explored. Final purpose was to provide a guideline helpful in promoting increase in the extent of tumor resection while preserving the patients’ neurological and cognitive functioning.

Original languageEnglish
Article number102435
Number of pages19
JournalNeuroImage: Clinical
Volume28
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Keywords

  • Contralesional hemisphere
  • Glioma
  • Postoperative plasticity
  • Preoperative plasticity
  • White matter and connectivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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