What Is the Best Initial Empirical Treatment of Suspected Sepsis in a Newborn Readmitted Soon after Discharge Home in an Era of Increased Resistance to Antibiotics? A Report of Two Cases

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background Colonization/infection by antibiotic-resistant bacteria is becoming a major threat to health care systems. Case report Two septic neonates were readmitted in our hospital few days after hospital discharge. In both of them, microbiological workup revealed an infection caused by multiresistant pathogens. Noteworthy, one baby had received intensive care management for 4 weeks, whereas the other had been vaginally delivered and sent home on his second day of life. Conclusion These cases suggest that in countries and/or hospital with high prevalence of colonization/infection by resistant pathogens in nurseries, neonatal intensive care units, and obstetric wards, the choice of initial therapy of suspected sepsis in a neonate readmitted from home soon after discharge should take into account the possibility of an infection due to a multiresistant pathogen.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1090-1092
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Perinatology
Volume33
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2016

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Microbial Drug Resistance
Sepsis
Infection
Nurseries
Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Therapeutics
Critical Care
Obstetrics
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Bacteria
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • antibiotic-resistant pathogen
  • initial empirical treatment
  • neonate
  • suspected sepsis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Cite this

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title = "What Is the Best Initial Empirical Treatment of Suspected Sepsis in a Newborn Readmitted Soon after Discharge Home in an Era of Increased Resistance to Antibiotics? A Report of Two Cases",
abstract = "Background Colonization/infection by antibiotic-resistant bacteria is becoming a major threat to health care systems. Case report Two septic neonates were readmitted in our hospital few days after hospital discharge. In both of them, microbiological workup revealed an infection caused by multiresistant pathogens. Noteworthy, one baby had received intensive care management for 4 weeks, whereas the other had been vaginally delivered and sent home on his second day of life. Conclusion These cases suggest that in countries and/or hospital with high prevalence of colonization/infection by resistant pathogens in nurseries, neonatal intensive care units, and obstetric wards, the choice of initial therapy of suspected sepsis in a neonate readmitted from home soon after discharge should take into account the possibility of an infection due to a multiresistant pathogen.",
keywords = "antibiotic-resistant pathogen, initial empirical treatment, neonate, suspected sepsis",
author = "Elio Castagnola and Livia Gargiullo and Salvatore Renna and Anna Loy and Francesco Risso and Andrea Moscatelli and Ivana Baldelli and Giuliana Cangemi and Roberto Bandettini",
year = "2016",
month = "9",
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doi = "10.1055/s-0036-1586104",
language = "English",
volume = "33",
pages = "1090--1092",
journal = "American Journal of Perinatology",
issn = "0735-1631",
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T1 - What Is the Best Initial Empirical Treatment of Suspected Sepsis in a Newborn Readmitted Soon after Discharge Home in an Era of Increased Resistance to Antibiotics? A Report of Two Cases

AU - Castagnola, Elio

AU - Gargiullo, Livia

AU - Renna, Salvatore

AU - Loy, Anna

AU - Risso, Francesco

AU - Moscatelli, Andrea

AU - Baldelli, Ivana

AU - Cangemi, Giuliana

AU - Bandettini, Roberto

PY - 2016/9/1

Y1 - 2016/9/1

N2 - Background Colonization/infection by antibiotic-resistant bacteria is becoming a major threat to health care systems. Case report Two septic neonates were readmitted in our hospital few days after hospital discharge. In both of them, microbiological workup revealed an infection caused by multiresistant pathogens. Noteworthy, one baby had received intensive care management for 4 weeks, whereas the other had been vaginally delivered and sent home on his second day of life. Conclusion These cases suggest that in countries and/or hospital with high prevalence of colonization/infection by resistant pathogens in nurseries, neonatal intensive care units, and obstetric wards, the choice of initial therapy of suspected sepsis in a neonate readmitted from home soon after discharge should take into account the possibility of an infection due to a multiresistant pathogen.

AB - Background Colonization/infection by antibiotic-resistant bacteria is becoming a major threat to health care systems. Case report Two septic neonates were readmitted in our hospital few days after hospital discharge. In both of them, microbiological workup revealed an infection caused by multiresistant pathogens. Noteworthy, one baby had received intensive care management for 4 weeks, whereas the other had been vaginally delivered and sent home on his second day of life. Conclusion These cases suggest that in countries and/or hospital with high prevalence of colonization/infection by resistant pathogens in nurseries, neonatal intensive care units, and obstetric wards, the choice of initial therapy of suspected sepsis in a neonate readmitted from home soon after discharge should take into account the possibility of an infection due to a multiresistant pathogen.

KW - antibiotic-resistant pathogen

KW - initial empirical treatment

KW - neonate

KW - suspected sepsis

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