What the oncologist can learn from diabetes studies

Epidemiology, prevention, management, cure

Adriana Albini, Marco Gallo

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Notwithstanding massive efforts and investment in improving cancer therapy, the limited progress made in reducing overall mortality has mostly been achieved through early diagnosis. Mortality rates for cardiovascular disease are in decline, a success attributable in large part to an active prevention approach coupled with identification of risk factors and biomarkers. Promising natural and synthetic molecules including numerous flavonoids have the potential to be used in diabetes care and in prevention of cardiovascular pathologies. These concepts should also be applied to cancer, the incidence of which continues to increase. In cancer chemoprevention low toxicity drugs or dietary constituents are used to prevent or delay onset of malignancy. Evidence is accumulating that cancer chemoprevention is a valuable weapon against human cancer. For example, doubling of fruit and fiber intake is associated with reduction of colorectal cancer whereas fat food consumption appears to increase malignant progression of certain tumors. Breast, colorectal and prostate cancer are the most suitable cancers for dietary prevention and scientists have strong data in these cancers at basic, translational, clinical and epidemiological levels, due to experimental evidence and the large EPIC study. Physical activity is also crucial. Yet, cancer chemoprevention research in oncology is largely underrepresented and lags far behind the efforts dedicated to therapy; it is important to close this gap. Few European phase III clinical trials are ongoing and systematic development of novel agents for cancer prevention is rare in Europe.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)364-368
Number of pages5
JournalDiabetes Research and Clinical Practice
Volume143
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2018

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Epidemiology
Neoplasms
Chemoprevention
Colorectal Neoplasms
Oncologists
Phase III Clinical Trials
Weapons
Mortality
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Flavonoids
Early Diagnosis
Fruit
Prostatic Neoplasms
Cardiovascular Diseases
Biomarkers
Fats
Exercise
Pathology
Breast Neoplasms
Food

Keywords

  • Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Oncologists/education
  • Risk Factors

Cite this

What the oncologist can learn from diabetes studies : Epidemiology, prevention, management, cure. / Albini, Adriana; Gallo, Marco.

In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, Vol. 143, 09.2018, p. 364-368.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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