When "Crack walnuts" lies in different brain regions: Evidence from a voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Theories of lexical processing differ as to how multimorphemic words, such as compounds, are mentally processed. The most recent findings seem to support the dual route hypothesis, which assumes that complex words can be stored and retrieved either whole or by decomposition into their constituents. Despite great efforts to investigate the cognitive mechanisms involved in processing complex words, very little is known about how compounds are represented in the brain. The present study was designed to address this issue in a group of 20 left-hemispheric stroke patients who were submitted to four picture-naming tasks involving nouns, verbs, noun-noun (NN) and verb-noun (VN) compounds. To determine the brain lesions implicated in these tasks, we analyzed patients performances together with their lesions using Voxel-based Lesion Symptom Mapping (VLSM). Results showed that while NN involved the same temporal areas as nouns, VN (although they belong to the noun category) involved different fronto-temporal regions. This latter finding is discussed within the view that distinct mechanisms process the different constituents of complex words.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)433-442
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the International Neuropsychological Society
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2010

Keywords

  • Aphasia
  • Compound words
  • Grammatical categories
  • Lexicon
  • Naming
  • VLSM

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Neuroscience(all)

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