Which is the best strategy for diagnosing bronchial carcinoid tumours? The role of dual tracer PET/CT scan

Filippo Lococo, Giorgio Treglia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bronchial carcinoids (BC) are rare well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours (NET) sub-classified into typical (TC) and atypical carcinoids (AC). A correct pathological identification in the pre-operative setting is a key element for planning the best strategy of care, considering the different biological behavior of TC and AC. Controversial results have been reported on the diagnostic accuracy of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) in BC. On the other hand, there is increasing evidence supporting the use of PET with somatostatin analogues (dotanoc, dotatoc or dotatate) labeled with gallium-68 ( 68Ga) in pulmonary NET. Based on information obtained by using different radiopharmaceuticals and different 68Ga labeled somatostatin analogues in PET and PET/CT studies, we are able to diagnose BC. In conclusion, by using somatostatin receptor imaging and 18F-FDG PET/CT scan, we can differentiate BC from benign pulmonary lesions and TC from AC by specific diagnostic patterns. Clinical trials on larger groups of patient would allow for a better and "tailored" therapeutic strategy in NET patients using dual-tracer PET/CT to identify BC and distinguish between TC and AC.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7-9
Number of pages3
JournalHellenic Journal of Nuclear Medicine
Volume17
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Carcinoid Tumor
Neuroendocrine Tumors
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
Somatostatin
Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography
Somatostatin Receptors
Lung
Gallium
Radiopharmaceuticals
Clinical Trials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Which is the best strategy for diagnosing bronchial carcinoid tumours? The role of dual tracer PET/CT scan. / Lococo, Filippo; Treglia, Giorgio.

In: Hellenic Journal of Nuclear Medicine, Vol. 17, No. 1, 2014, p. 7-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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