Whole-arm rehabilitation following stroke: Hand module

L. Masia, H. I. Krebs, P. Cappa, N. Hogan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

In 1991, a novel robot named MIT-MANUS was introduced as a test bed to study the potential of using robots to assist in and quantify the neuro-rehabilitation of motor function. It introduced a new brand of therapy, offering a highly backdrivable mechanism with a soft and stable feel for the user. MIT-MANUS proved an excellent fit for shoulder and elbow rehabilitation in stroke patients, showing in clinical trials a reduction of impairment in these joints. The greater reduction in impairment was observed in the group of muscles exercised. This suggests a need for additional robots to rehabilitate other target areas of the body. The focus here is a robot for hand rehabilitation. Previous work has expanded the planar MIT-MANUS including an anti-gravity robot for shoulder-and-elbow training, and a wrist robot for wrist flexion-extension, abduction-adduction, and pronation-supination training. In this paper we present the "missing link": a hand robot. We will discuss the basic system design and characterization. A comprehensive review of the hand robot design, characterization, and initial whole-arm clinical results are being submitted elsewhere (IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering).

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the First IEEE/RAS-EMBS International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics, 2006, BioRob 2006
Pages1085-1089
Number of pages5
Volume2006
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006
Event1st IEEE/RAS-EMBS International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics, 2006, BioRob 2006 - Pisa, Italy
Duration: Feb 20 2006Feb 22 2006

Other

Other1st IEEE/RAS-EMBS International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics, 2006, BioRob 2006
CountryItaly
CityPisa
Period2/20/062/22/06

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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