Whole-brain microstructural white matter alterations in borderline personality disorder patients: Personality and Mental Health

G. Quattrini, M. Marizzoni, L.R. Magni, S. Magnaldi, M. Lanfredi, G. Rossi, G.B. Frisoni, M. Pievani, R. Rossi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a psychiatric condition associated with the impairment of the frontolimbic network. However, a growing body of studies suggests that brain dysfunction underling BPD could involve other brain areas. We explored the whole-brain white matter (WM) organization in BPD patients to clarify the structural pattern underlying the disease and its relationship with clinical features. Methods: Fourteen BPD patients and 14 healthy controls underwent a multidimensional clinical assessment and diffusion tensor imaging acquisition. Measures of fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean, axial and radial (RD) diffusivity were collected, and alterations in the WM were assessed using the voxelwise approach, including substance and alcohol abuse as covariates. Voxelwise regression analysis was performed to identify associations between microstructural changes and clinical feature in BPD. Results: Group comparisons showed alterations only for FA and RD: FA decreased in the right posterior hemisphere, while RD increased bilaterally and widespread in anterior and posterior areas (p 
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)96-106
Number of pages11
JournalPers. Ment. Health
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

  • adult
  • borderline state
  • brain cortex
  • diagnostic imaging
  • diffusion tensor imaging
  • female
  • human
  • male
  • middle aged
  • nerve tract
  • pathology
  • white matter
  • Adult
  • Borderline Personality Disorder
  • Cerebral Cortex
  • Diffusion Tensor Imaging
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Neural Pathways
  • White Matter

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