Why is "Red Cross" different from "Yellow Cross"? A neuropsychological study of noun-adjective agreement within Italian compounds

Sara Mondini, Gonia Jarema, Claudio Luzzatti, Cristina Burani, Carlo Semenza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study investigates the performance of two Italian nonfluent aphasic patients on noun-adjective agreement in compounds and in noun phrases. A completion, a reading, and a repetition task were administered. Results show that both patients were able to correctly inflect adjectives within compounds, but not in noun phrases. Moreover, they were sensitive to constituent order (noun-adjective vs adjective-noun) within noun phrases, but less so within compounds. These results suggest differential processing for compounds as compared to noun phrases: While the latter require standard morphosyntactic operations that are often impaired in aphasic patients, the former can be accessed as whole words at the lexical level.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)621-634
Number of pages14
JournalBrain and Language
Volume81
Issue number1-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Keywords

  • Compound nouns
  • Dual route model
  • Italian aphasics
  • Lexical units
  • Noun phrases
  • Noun-adjective agreement
  • Syntactic processing
  • Whole-word access

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Why is "Red Cross" different from "Yellow Cross"? A neuropsychological study of noun-adjective agreement within Italian compounds'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this