Yeast and mammalian metabolism continuous monitoring by pressure recording as an assessment technique for xenobiotic agent effects

M. Milani, M. Ballerini, L. Ferraro, E. Marelli, F. Mazza, M. Zabeo

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Our work is devoted to the Study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human lymphocytes cellular metabolism in order to develop a reference model to assess biological systems responses to chemical or physical agents exposure. CO 2 variations inside test-tubes are measured by differential pressure sensors; pressure values are subsequently convened in voltage. The system allows to test up to 16 samples at the same time. Sampling manages up to 100 acquisitions per second. Values are recorded by a data acquisition card connected to a computer. This procedure leads to a standard curve (pressure variation versus time), typical of the cellular line, that describe cellular metabolism. The longest time lapse used is of 170 h. Different phases appear in this curve: an initial growth up to a maximum, followed by a decrement that leads to a typical "depression" (pressure value inside the test-tubes is lower than the initial one) after about 35 h from the beginning in the case of yeast cells. The curve is reproducible within an experimental error of 4%. The analysis of many samples and the low cost of the devices allow a good statistical significance of the data. In particular as a test we will compare two sterilising agents effects: UV radiation and amuchina®.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
EditorsG.E. Cohn
Pages44-55
Number of pages12
Volume4625
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002
EventClinical Diagnostic Systems: Technologies and Instrumentation - San Jose, CA, United States
Duration: Jan 22 2002Jan 24 2002

Other

OtherClinical Diagnostic Systems: Technologies and Instrumentation
CountryUnited States
CitySan Jose, CA
Period1/22/021/24/02

Fingerprint

yeast
metabolism
Metabolism
Yeast
recording
Monitoring
curves
Lymphocytes
Pressure sensors
Biological systems
tubes
saccharomyces
Ultraviolet radiation
differential pressure
lymphocytes
Data acquisition
cards
pressure sensors
Cells
Sampling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Milani, M., Ballerini, M., Ferraro, L., Marelli, E., Mazza, F., & Zabeo, M. (2002). Yeast and mammalian metabolism continuous monitoring by pressure recording as an assessment technique for xenobiotic agent effects. In G. E. Cohn (Ed.), Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 4625, pp. 44-55) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.469775

Yeast and mammalian metabolism continuous monitoring by pressure recording as an assessment technique for xenobiotic agent effects. / Milani, M.; Ballerini, M.; Ferraro, L.; Marelli, E.; Mazza, F.; Zabeo, M.

Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. ed. / G.E. Cohn. Vol. 4625 2002. p. 44-55.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Milani, M, Ballerini, M, Ferraro, L, Marelli, E, Mazza, F & Zabeo, M 2002, Yeast and mammalian metabolism continuous monitoring by pressure recording as an assessment technique for xenobiotic agent effects. in GE Cohn (ed.), Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. vol. 4625, pp. 44-55, Clinical Diagnostic Systems: Technologies and Instrumentation, San Jose, CA, United States, 1/22/02. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.469775
Milani M, Ballerini M, Ferraro L, Marelli E, Mazza F, Zabeo M. Yeast and mammalian metabolism continuous monitoring by pressure recording as an assessment technique for xenobiotic agent effects. In Cohn GE, editor, Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 4625. 2002. p. 44-55 https://doi.org/10.1117/12.469775
Milani, M. ; Ballerini, M. ; Ferraro, L. ; Marelli, E. ; Mazza, F. ; Zabeo, M. / Yeast and mammalian metabolism continuous monitoring by pressure recording as an assessment technique for xenobiotic agent effects. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. editor / G.E. Cohn. Vol. 4625 2002. pp. 44-55
@inproceedings{25ba227a600f45b5b79d4b20e3506b60,
title = "Yeast and mammalian metabolism continuous monitoring by pressure recording as an assessment technique for xenobiotic agent effects",
abstract = "Our work is devoted to the Study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human lymphocytes cellular metabolism in order to develop a reference model to assess biological systems responses to chemical or physical agents exposure. CO 2 variations inside test-tubes are measured by differential pressure sensors; pressure values are subsequently convened in voltage. The system allows to test up to 16 samples at the same time. Sampling manages up to 100 acquisitions per second. Values are recorded by a data acquisition card connected to a computer. This procedure leads to a standard curve (pressure variation versus time), typical of the cellular line, that describe cellular metabolism. The longest time lapse used is of 170 h. Different phases appear in this curve: an initial growth up to a maximum, followed by a decrement that leads to a typical {"}depression{"} (pressure value inside the test-tubes is lower than the initial one) after about 35 h from the beginning in the case of yeast cells. The curve is reproducible within an experimental error of 4{\%}. The analysis of many samples and the low cost of the devices allow a good statistical significance of the data. In particular as a test we will compare two sterilising agents effects: UV radiation and amuchina{\circledR}.",
author = "M. Milani and M. Ballerini and L. Ferraro and E. Marelli and F. Mazza and M. Zabeo",
year = "2002",
doi = "10.1117/12.469775",
language = "English",
volume = "4625",
pages = "44--55",
editor = "G.E. Cohn",
booktitle = "Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Yeast and mammalian metabolism continuous monitoring by pressure recording as an assessment technique for xenobiotic agent effects

AU - Milani, M.

AU - Ballerini, M.

AU - Ferraro, L.

AU - Marelli, E.

AU - Mazza, F.

AU - Zabeo, M.

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - Our work is devoted to the Study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human lymphocytes cellular metabolism in order to develop a reference model to assess biological systems responses to chemical or physical agents exposure. CO 2 variations inside test-tubes are measured by differential pressure sensors; pressure values are subsequently convened in voltage. The system allows to test up to 16 samples at the same time. Sampling manages up to 100 acquisitions per second. Values are recorded by a data acquisition card connected to a computer. This procedure leads to a standard curve (pressure variation versus time), typical of the cellular line, that describe cellular metabolism. The longest time lapse used is of 170 h. Different phases appear in this curve: an initial growth up to a maximum, followed by a decrement that leads to a typical "depression" (pressure value inside the test-tubes is lower than the initial one) after about 35 h from the beginning in the case of yeast cells. The curve is reproducible within an experimental error of 4%. The analysis of many samples and the low cost of the devices allow a good statistical significance of the data. In particular as a test we will compare two sterilising agents effects: UV radiation and amuchina®.

AB - Our work is devoted to the Study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human lymphocytes cellular metabolism in order to develop a reference model to assess biological systems responses to chemical or physical agents exposure. CO 2 variations inside test-tubes are measured by differential pressure sensors; pressure values are subsequently convened in voltage. The system allows to test up to 16 samples at the same time. Sampling manages up to 100 acquisitions per second. Values are recorded by a data acquisition card connected to a computer. This procedure leads to a standard curve (pressure variation versus time), typical of the cellular line, that describe cellular metabolism. The longest time lapse used is of 170 h. Different phases appear in this curve: an initial growth up to a maximum, followed by a decrement that leads to a typical "depression" (pressure value inside the test-tubes is lower than the initial one) after about 35 h from the beginning in the case of yeast cells. The curve is reproducible within an experimental error of 4%. The analysis of many samples and the low cost of the devices allow a good statistical significance of the data. In particular as a test we will compare two sterilising agents effects: UV radiation and amuchina®.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036399971&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036399971&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1117/12.469775

DO - 10.1117/12.469775

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:0036399971

VL - 4625

SP - 44

EP - 55

BT - Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering

A2 - Cohn, G.E.

ER -